The New York Times, January 2, 1891
Dissolution of Partnership
Owing to the death of Mr. John B. Trevor, the firm of JAMES B. COLGATE & COMPANY - composed of JAMES B. COLGATE, JOHN B. TREVOR, and COLGATE HOYT - is this day dissolved. All accounts of the firm in liquid will be settled by Mr. JAMES B. COLGATE.
(signed)
JAMES B. COLGATE
COLGATE HOYT
NEW YORK, Dec. 31. 1890
--
James Boorman Colgate married Ellen Sarah Hoyt
source: Robert Colgate the Immigrant
Named one son Hoyt Colgate...so, a Hoyt family member may have named their son Colgate Hoyt.
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William H. Colgate, the 1880 civil engineer living in Oconomowoc, is probably the son of James Boorman/Bowles Colgate, and may very well have worked on the Wisconsin Central during 1885-86 when Colgate Station was founded.
Now...was Colgate station named for James B. Colgate because he was a big investor inthe WCRR expansion, or was it Colgate Hoyt, the WCRR Director, or William H. Colgate, who may have worked on the road as a civil engineer,
OR...some unknown John Colgate?
---
It was fairly commonplace to have stations on the railroad named for the company’s officers and officials. It is possible, I suppose, for Colgate to have been named after one Colgate Hoyt who was elected as a director of the original Wisconsin Central Railway in 1887, about the time the WC built through the area. Apparently his tenure on the WC Board of Directors was rather limited. He was also a director on the board of the mighty Northern Pacific at the same time. And, as I recall, there was a station on the WC’s line into the Gogebic Range in Northern Wisconsin named Hoyt.
James Boorman Colgate, ( WC investor and I believe director at one time) who owned a wall street bank. His partner was the respected banker, John B. Trevor (who became an investor in the Chicago extension of 1886 and entered the directory of the NP with Colby and Abbot in September 1887).
 
When the line to Chicago was built in 1885, it was mainly an air line, striking few cities. Towns were named and sprung up along the line. I would surmise that Colgate was named after James Boorman Colgate, also an investor in the WC). There is a Hoyt in Wisconsin, near the iron range. I am not sure if this was named after Colgate Hoyt. He was a trustee for the WC's mining interests in the area. The extension into the iron range was shortly after the Chicago Extension was completed.
There is a Trevor in Wisconsin and was a Rockefeller (now Mundelein) in Illinois along the Chicago Extension.
That the idea of it being named after a man/engineer named John Colgate isn't very likely to have happened?

I doubt if it would have been named after an engineer. Usually stations were named after an important official or investor. The people in Mundelein claim that Rockefeller was named after William, John's brother. This is highly unlikely, as William was not an investor, John was. I state in my book that it was named after John.
The railroad could name their depot after anyone they desired. They did not have to get approval. Sometimes the depot was named after an individual who donated the land. (Franklin Park after Lessor Franklin, Thatchers Park after John Thatcher. They would also give the depot a temporary name until the person it was named , Holcombs, which became Rockefeller
The station depot established south of Colgate in East Sussex would have been due to the village's name at the time. Later, when James Templeton established a new post office at East Sussex, he petitioned to have East Sussex renamed to "Templeton".

James Templeton was a director of the Chicago, Wisconsin & Northern Railroad, which was chartered to find a route from Slinger to the state line. It was absorbed into the Chicago, Wisconsin & Northern which built and operated the line. In that case the Post office was already located, thus it would need approval to be renamed. Probably not difficult, as I believe Col Herbert Enos was postmaster for the area and was also on the BOD.
The Chicago, Wisconsin & Northern was chartered in march 26, 1884 to operate a railroad between the state line and a point in Washington County, most likely Slinger or Hartford. It was chartered to distance itself from the WC, who did not want anyone to know that it was planning to build to Chicago. After they had assembled a right of way, the Chicago, Wisconsin and Minnesota railroad, was incorporated Aug 19, 1885 to build a railroad between the state line to Slinger. This railroad was controlled by Colby, Abbot and Hoyt. Among its shareholders was Rockefeller, James Colgate and John Trevor. At a shareholders meeting held May 1, 1886, the Chicago, Wisconsin and Northern delivered all of its rights, titles, contract and other property to the Chicago, Wisconsin and Minnesota. This was because all the land contracts were in the name of the CW&N. The CW&M built the railroad, but did not operate it. The CW&M, along with the Illinois portion, the Chicago & Wisconsin, was leased to another Colby and Abbot controlled company called the Wisconsin and Minnesota Railroad. That line in turn was leased to the WC.

The WC was in receivership at this time, thus could not do any railroad building. It simply leased the line for 37% of revenues and operated it. It was a very complicated affair. Each of the leased lines had separate directors and shareholders. Later the Wisconsin and Minnesota lease was dissolved and the CW&M was leased to the WC, which operated it until 1899, when all the leased lines were consolidated into the newly reorganized WC Railway.
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It was fairly commonplace to have stations on the railroad named for the company’s officers and officials. It is possible for Colgate to have been named after one Colgate Hoyt who was elected as a director of the original Wisconsin Central Railway in 1887, about the time the WC built through the area (there was a station on the WC’s line into the Gogebic Range in Northern Wisconsin named Hoyt.)
When the line to Chicago was built in 1885, it can be surmised that Colgate was named after James Boorman Colgate, an investor in the WC). Besides a Hoyt in Wisconsin, there is a Trevor in Wisconsin, and was a Rockefeller (now Mundelein) in Illinois along the Chicago Extension.
That the idea of it being named after a man/engineer named John Colgate isn't very likely to have happened. Usually stations were named after an important official or investor.
---
David Leider is an amateur historian on railroads. Wrote one book, "The Waupaca and its Railroads". He just finished a second, "The History of the Wisconsin Central in Illinois". It documents the building of the extension from Slinger to Chicago up until the WC was leased by the Soo Line in 1909. It will be about 260 pages.Also written about 20 articles about the Wisconsin Central in Wisconsin and Illinois, including profiles of Burlington, Waukesha and Waupaca.

In addition, he am a model railroader and has written many articles for model railroad magazines, most about his layout modeled after Waupaca.. He is secretary of the Soo Line Historical and Technical Society and a member of the Milwaukee road and Chicago & Northwestern Historical Society, the Railroad and Locomotive Historical Society and the Lexington Group. The last article he wrote was on the Pickle industry in Wisconsin, Michigan and Illinois and is working on an article detailing the camp trains that used to take boys and girls from Chicago to the various camps in Northern Wisconsin.

I graduated with a BS in Ornamental Horticulture from the University of Illinois. I live in Prospect Heights Illinois and work for a wholesale perennial grower in northern Illinois.

This is probably a lot more than you wanted to know. Prune as you see fit
David
 

When the line to Chicago was built in 1885, it was mainly an air line, striking few cities. Towns were named and sprung up along the line. I would surmise that Colgate was named after James Boorman Colgate, also an investor in the WC). There is a Hoyt in Wisconsin, near the iron range. I am not sure if this was named after Colgate Hoyt. He was a trustee for the WC's mining interests in the area. The extension into the iron range was shortly after the Chicago Extension was completed. There is a Trevor in Wisconsin and was a Rockefeller (now Mundelein) in Illinois along the Chicago Extension.

That the idea of it being named after a man/engineer named John Colgate isn't very likely to have happened?

I doubt if it would have been named after an engineer. Usually stations were named after an important official or investor. The people in Mundelein claim that Rockefeller was named after William, John's brother. This is highly unlikely, as William was not an investor, John was. I state in my book that it was named after John.

The railroad could name their depot after anyone they desired. They did not have to get approval. Sometimes the depot was named after an individual who donated the land. (Franklin Park after Lessor Franklin, Thatchers Park after John Thatcher. They would also give the depot a temporary name until the person it was named , Holcombs, which became Rockefeller

---------------------

The station depot established south of Colgate in East Sussex would have been due to the village's name at the time. Later, when James Templeton established a new post office at East Sussex, he petitioned to have East Sussex renamed to "Templeton".

James Templeton was a director of the Chicago, Wisconsin & Northern Railroad, which was chartered to find a route from Slinger to the state line. It was absorbed into the Chicago, Wisconsin & Northern which built and operated the line. In that case the Post office was already located, thus it would need approval to be renamed. Probably not difficult, as I believe Col Herbert Enos was postmaster for the area and was also on the BOD.

The Chicago, Wisconsin & Northern was chartered in march 26, 1884 to operate a railroad between the state line and a point in Washington County, most likely Slinger or Hartford. It was chartered to distance itself from the WC, who did not want anyone to know that it was planning to build to Chicago. After they had assembled a right of way, the Chicago, Wisconsin and Minnesota railroad, was incorporated Aug 19, 1885 to build a railroad between the state line to Slinger. This railroad was controlled by Colby, Abbot and Hoyt. Among its shareholders was Rockefeller, James Colgate and John Trevor. At a shareholders meeting held May 1, 1886, the Chicago, Wisconsin and Northern delivered all of its rights, titles, contract and other property to the Chicago, Wisconsin and Minnesota. This was because all the land contracts were in the name of the CW&N. The CW&M built the railroad, but did not operate it. The CW&M, along with the Illinois portion, the Chicago & Wisconsin, was leased to another Colby and Abbot controlled company called the Wisconsin and Minnesota Railroad. That line in turn was leased to the WC.


The WC was in receivership at this time, thus could not do any railroad building. It simply leased the line for 37% of revenues and operated it. It was a very complicated affair. Each of the leased lines had separate directors and shareholders. Later the Wisconsin and Minnesota lease was dissolved and the CW&M was leased to the WC, which operated it until 1899, when all the leased lines were consolidated into the newly reorganized WC Railway.

---

It was fairly commonplace to have stations on the railroad named for the company’s officers and officials. It is possible for Colgate to have been named after one Colgate Hoyt who was elected as a director of the original Wisconsin Central Railway in 1887, about the time the WC built through the area (there was a station on the WC’s line into the Gogebic Range in Northern Wisconsin named Hoyt.)

When the line to Chicago was built in 1885, it can be surmised that Colgate was named after James Boorman Colgate, an investor in the WC). Besides a Hoyt in Wisconsin, there is a Trevor in Wisconsin, and was a Rockefeller (now Mundelein) in Illinois along the Chicago Extension.

That the idea of it being named after a man/engineer named John Colgate isn't very likely to have happened. Usually stations were named after an important official or investor.

---

David Leider is an amateur historian on railroads. Wrote one book, "The Waupaca and its Railroads". He just finished a second, "The History of the Wisconsin Central in Illinois". It documents the building of the extension from Slinger to Chicago up until the WC was leased by the Soo Line in 1909. It will be about 260 pages.Also written about 20 articles about the Wisconsin Central in Wisconsin and Illinois, including profiles of Burlington, Waukesha and Waupaca.

In addition, he is a model railroader and has written many articles for model railroad magazines, most about his layout modeled after Waupaca. He is secretary of the Soo Line Historical and Technical Society and a member of the Milwaukee road and Chicago & Northwestern Historical Society, the Railroad and Locomotive Historical Society and the Lexington Group. The last article he wrote was on the Pickle industry in Wisconsin, Michigan and Illinois and is working on an article detailing the camp trains that used to take boys and girls from Chicago to the various camps in Northern Wisconsin.

James Boorman Colgate married Ellen Sarah Hoyt

source: Robert Colgate the Immigrant

Named one son Hoyt Colgate...so, a Hoyt family member may have named their son Colgate Hoyt.

---

William H. Colgate, the 1880 civil engineer living in Oconomowoc, is probably the son of James Boorman/Bowles Colgate, and may very well have worked on the Wisconsin Central during 1885-86 when Colgate Station was founded.

Now...was Colgate station named for James B. Colgate because he was a big investor inthe WCRR expansion, or was it Colgate Hoyt, the WCRR Director, or William H. Colgate, who may have worked on the road as a civil engineer,

OR...some unknown John Colgate?

It was fairly commonplace to have stations on the railroad named for the company’s officers and officials. It is possible, I suppose, for Colgate to have been named after one Colgate Hoyt who was elected as a director of the original Wisconsin Central Railway in 1887, about the time the WC built through the area. Apparently his tenure on the WC Board of Directors was rather limited. He was also a director on the board of the mighty Northern Pacific at the same time. And, as I recall, there was a station on the WC’s line into the Gogebic Range in Northern Wisconsin named Hoyt.

James Boorman Colgate, ( WC investor and I believe director at one time) who owned a wall street bank. His partner was the respected banker, John B. Trevor (who became an investor in the Chicago extension of 1886 and entered the directory of the NP with Colby and Abbot in September 1887).


1889, Minnesota. Stock certificate Nr. A94 for one share. Brown/Black. Engraved vignette of a steam locomotive at train platform. Signed by Colgate Hoyt as President. Colgate Hoyt (1849 - 1922) Partner in the firm of J. B. Colgate & Co., bankers and dealers in bullion; Director of the Union Pacific Railway; Trustee of the Wisconsin Central Railroad; Involved with the Chicago & Northern Pacific Railroad; Director of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Co, the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, and the Oregon & Transcontinental Co. Punch and stamp cancellations affect Hoyt's signature. This item is encapsulated and accompanied by a PASS-CO Securities Pass. EF.