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Index to Wisconsin Brewery and Related Articles
   

 

Index to Wisconsin Brewery and Related Articles

Sussex (Lisbon Township) Brewery History

 

by Michael R. Reilly, editor,  January 27, 2013, copyright

Last updated 08/16/2015

The Sussex Brewery at 36 Main Rd Emsworth PO10 8AU, United Kingdom‎ (probably nothing like what our old brewery looked like).

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"Very many will remember the first turkey-shoot that came off in this town, and very likely the first in the county. In 1839, David Bonham got the turkeys, and men came from far and near and had a big time. Among other preparations made for the event, Bonham went with Thomas Redford to Milwaukee for a keg of beer. In coming home over the rough roads the beer got so shook up, that it burst out the bung, and it was not drank by turkey-shooters." source: The History of Waukesha County, Wisconsin, 1881, Page 770

Might the town residents been drinking Owens's?

50 BARRELS OWENS'S SUPERIOR SUMMER BEER, just received, and for sale low, by

WM. BROWN & CO

May 30, 1838

source: Milwaukee Sentinel June 16, 1838, page 3 of 4.Note: Could this be Richard G. Owens, who lived in Buffalo prior to coming to Milwaukee in 1837? Who's credited with starting the first Milwaukee brewery in 1841???

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The Town's inhabitants needed a local brewery to quench their thirst!

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From Your Editor:

The Town of Lisbon, Waukesha County, Wisconsin did have at least one brewery operating in what is now the Village of Sussex off of north Maple Ave. What I'm publishing first are the various listing(s) from the most popular American resources; where the earliest of these obtained their information on our town of Lisbon brewery or breweries is unknown. I'm listing them accompanied by some of my notes of explanation.

The next entries found under "What this Editor has found", are those that I have personally found from Waukesha County Register of Deeds records, old newspaper articles, and town of Lisbon Tax and Assessment Records from the time period of brewery operation. These, I feel, are the most reliable todate found, and most accurately reflect the brewery history of our Town.

Based on these findings - the brewery was first built in the 1848/early 1849 time period!

Mike, Aug 19, 2013

BREWERIES

Primary sources for listings (shown in BOLD below) - American Breweries II by Dale P. Van Wieren, 1995; and American Breweries by Donald Bullfinch, 1984; and The Register of United States Breweries 1876-1976 by Manfred Friedrich and Donald Bull, 1976. Also: Badger Breweries: Past and Present by Wayne L. Kroll, 1976; Wisconsin's Frontier Farm Breweries, 1830's - 1880's, by Wayne Kroll, 2005; and "Breweries of Wisconsin" by Jerry Apps, 1992. The History of Waukesha County, Wis., 1880" .

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Bernard Hephen 1850s - Source: American Breweries II by Dale P. Van Wieren, 1995.

Note: Couldn't find any personal information using Ancestry.com Search, nor at the Waukesha County Museum Research Center [Nov 27, 2012].

Bernhard W. Hephen, source: Wisconsin's Frontier Farm Breweries, 1830's - 1880's, by Wayne Kroll, 2005.

Note: Diff in spelling by sources.

Note: After searching through the property deed records at the Waukesha County Register of Deeds office on November 28, 2012, I found no evidence of property purchase transactions occurring between Mr. Hephen and any Weaver, Stone, or Boots individual. His name isn't given at all within this first Vol of Abstract Title 1-19. Further searching into Milwaukee County kept records of the period may provide more information, there is a a time period, 1843 - 1850, where no transactions are provided in Vol of Abstract Title 1-19.

[Richard] Weaver & [Stephen] Stone, 1850s - Source: American Breweries II by Dale P. Van Wieren, 1995.

Note: 1850 Census, Lisbon, Stephen Stone is a farmer as are brothers, Richard and William Weaver. [The reason I've inserted [Richard] Weaver & [Stephen] Stone is the 1860 Fed Census lists both as a "Brewer". Though it may have been James Weaver ]

William Weaver & James Stone, source: Wisconsin's Frontier Farm Breweries, 1830's - 1880's, by Wayne Kroll, 2005.

Note: James Stone's name is never found in any records that I know of. William Weaver, first listed here by Kroll; it was thought to be he, perhaps because William's daughter Eleanor married Ephraim Boots, a later brewery owner.

Notes: 1850 Samuel Butler, 57, Massachusetts, Tavern Keeper [Note: based on his 1850 Census location, he probably worked at David Bonham's public house?]

1860 Census, Lisbon, Stephen Stone, age 41, is a Brewer; no Boots in area.

1860 Census, Lisbon, Richard Weaver, 32, Brewer, England

1860 Census, Lisbon, William Spink, 58, tavern keeper, England

1860 Census, Lisbon, Ephraim Boots is a carpenter and married to Eleanor Stone. Edward and Henry also carpenters.

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The brewery, which stood about one-half mile north of the mill [Sussex Mills], on the road from Sussex, was first built by Stephen Stone just north of Maple and Main {then North St.} (Sts.)] about 1855. In 1861, Mr. Boots became the proprietor. Twelve years after, in 1874, Mr. Boots had the misfortune to lose the old brewery by fire. In 1875, it was rebuilt.

Above Source: Ephraim Boots, Sussex Brewery in the 1800s Photos from the collection of Sussex Village Historian Fred H. Keller, Sussex Sun, May 15, 2012

Note: On March 9, 1860, Ephraim Boots, a carpenter by trade, entered into an agreement with James Weaver, to operate Mr. Weaver's saw mill, and acquiring said mill after providing Mr. Weaver two years worth of sawn lumber from the saw mill.

Apparently the deal fell thru, or maybe Mr. Boots sold the mill assets to purchase the brewery in 1861-62?

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Ephraim Boots, aka Ephraim Boots & Co., aka Sussex Brewery; c1870-1880. Source: Wayne Kroll identifies the brewery simply as "Ephraim Boots". American Breweries II by Dale P. Van Wieren, 1995 ids as Ephraim Boots, aka Ephraim Boots & Co., while Fred H. Keller and "The History of Waukesha County, Wis., 1880" also call it the "Sussex Brewery".

Note: 1870 Fed Census, Lisbon, lists Ephraim Boots as a "Brewer". His father Edward and brother Henry are "Carpenters".

Note: 1880 Lisbon, Ephraim Boots, age 49 is listed as a "Brewer" ; his father Edward, "Works in brewery".

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Jos. Dvorak 1880-1884, Source: American Breweries II by Dale P. Van Wieren, 1995. [This entry appears to be correct as evidenced by what this Editor found.]

Note: In 1880 Fed Census there are numerous Jos. Dvoraks [most orig from Bohemia or Czechoslovakia], none living in Waukesha County, nor any Jos Dvorak being in the brewery business. A Jos Dvorak did live in Racine County, who later commited suicide.

Note: After searching through the property deed records at the Waukesha County Register of Deeds office on November 28, 2012, I found no evidence of property purchase transactions occurring between Mr. Dvorak and any Weaver, Stone, or Boots individual. His name isn't given at all within this first four Vols of Abstract Title 1, 2, 3, 4-19.

Editor Notes: On Tuesday and Wednesday, August 6 and 7, 2013, I reviewed the town of Lisbon record book, "Chattel Mortgages, Bill of Sale, Agreements, Settlements, Feb. 13, 1860 - Aug. 8, 1923", at the Lisbon Town Hall, with the following results:

July 8, 1881 Joseph Dvorak to Castenholly (?), Chattle Mortgage

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What this Editor has found:

Editor Notes: On Tuesday and Wednesday, August 6 and 7, 2013, I reviewed the town of Lisbon Tax and Assessment Records at the Lisbon Town Hall, with the following results:

1849 Weaver & Sims, 4 acres, Sec. 23. [First Tax/Assessment Record entry]

Note: Based on above record, the brewery was first built in the 1848/early 1849 time period. Edward Sims appears in the 1846 Tax/Assessment Records in 1846 owning 79 1/2 acres, in Sec. 35.

1850 James Weaver & Sims, brewery, 1 1/2 acres in Section 23

1851 James Weaver & Sims, 1 1/2 acres in Section 23

1852 Edward Sims & Weaver, 1.5 acres, Sec. 23.

1853 Sims & Weaver, 1 1/2 acres in Sec. 23, Value $300 [In 1853 James Weaver turns over his hops and brewery(?) business interests over to his son Richard]

1854 Stephen Stone & Co., 1/4 acre in Sec. 23.

1857 Weaver & Stone Brewery, 1/4 acre, Sec. 23., Value $250.

Note: Most of that brewery’s sales went through the Boots-owned tavern that stood where Sussex Auto, N64 W23936 Main St., is today. In August 1857 it was called the Stone Tavern.

Note: A Democratic Assembley District convention...will be held at the Stone Tavern, in the town of Lisbon... Source: Waukesha County Democrat | Waukesha, Wisconsin | Wednesday, August 19, 1857 | Page 2; also listed same in 1859.

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1858 Richard Weaver & Co., 1/4 acre in Sec. 23

1860 Stephen Stone & Co., 1/4 acre, Sec. 23

1861 Stone & Co. Brewery, on SW 1/4 Sec. 23, 1/4 acre, Value of Real Estate $150; State tax 34 cents; County tax 33 cents; Town tax 7 cents, County School tax 4 cents; District School tax 47 cents; Collectors Fee 6 cents; total Taxes & Fees $1.31

Note: Richard Weaver and his wife Rhoda sold the brewery to him on October 21, 1861 [see Abstract Title 1-19, vol 27, page 342]. James Weaver and his wife Elizabeth are also selling 2.4 acres to Mr. Boots on this same day [Vol 27, page 343.] Meanwhile there are also transactions going on between the Weavers and Stephen Stone, and not until June 24, 1864 does Stephen Stone transact the property over to Mr. Boots. Later in 1869 or thereabouts, there are several property transaction made to correct previous ones.

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Note - The Abstract of Title 1-19, Vol 27, page 342 gives the following description of the sale:

Property and building known as the "Sussex Brewery". Also a light wagon, a double set of harness, a Trade Power and Malt Grinder. Also all barrels, Punchions, and stock in trade belonging to said brewery.

This is later corrected in The Abstract of Title vol 27, pages 31-152 on August 5, 1864:

Sussex Brewery and all Puncheons, Barrels, Tun Tubs, Boiler Horse Power , Wagon and Harness.

Definition - Puncheons or Punchions:
1. In architecture, punchions are small upright timbers in wooden partitions. Since the 19th century they have been more usually called studs or quarters. 2. a short post, esp. one used for supporting the roof in a coal mine

Possible used in supporting the storage caves beneath the brewery?

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1862 Stone & Co., 1/4 acre, Sec. 23, Value $387.50; Total tax $2.92

1863 Stone & Co., brewery, 1/4 acre, Sec. 23, Value $186.37; $175 Real Estate

1864 Stone & Co., brewery, 1/4 acre, Sec. 23, Value $186.37; Total tax $1.54

[August 8, 1864 - Abstract of Title 1-19, 32/189: E. Boots to Samuel Stocker; involving brewery and dwelling house]

1865 Ephraim Boots, brewery [First listing of brewery with Boots]

[Feb 3, 1865 - Chattel Mortgage: Boots to J. N. Cadby; reason]

1866 Ephraim Boots, brewery, 1/4 acre, Value $200

Suicide at Sussex - On Tuesday Inst, Mr. Jeremiah Stone, an old resident of Lisbon, committed suicide at the village of Sussex, by taking strichnine. He went to McDonald's store that morning, and purchased ten cents worth of strichnine. From there, he went to the brewery where it is supposed he took it. He lived about two hours after swallowing the fatal dose. We learn that upon occasions he has exhibited simptoms of insanity. He leaves a wife and three children to mourn his loss.

An inquest, taken at Sussex, in the county of Waukesha, on the 14th and 15th days of August, 1866:

An excerpt recreation of his death -

The circumstances or facts of his death are these: He had been drinking liquor on Monday, pretty freely, and on Tuesday morning he went out into the harvest field and cradled a few minutes and then remarked to the boy, that was working for him, that he did not feel weel, and that he would go to Merton after the doctor. He then lay down and asked the boy to "drive them men away from him," and after a little he got up and went to the house, told his wife that he did not feel well. She told him to go and lay down. He said no, he was going to the store after some medicine.

So after a little he went to the store at Sussex, kept by Wm. McDonlad, and told Mrs. Melrose, who was tending the store, that he had a sore finger, had cut it with a scythe, and did not feel able to work, and he guessed he would go a poisoning rats to-day, and asked her for ten cents worth of strychnine. She gave it to him, labelled "Strychnine Poison," and told him to be careful, for it was very powerful. He said all right, he would; and as he was going out at the store door, she said to him, "You must not' take any of that yourself." "Oh, no," he said,- "They don't want me up there," pointing his hand upward to Heaven, and went off f'rom there to the brewery, kept by Mr. Boots, where he asked for some beer. Mr. Boots would not give him any, as he thought he was under the influence of liquor. While Mr. Boots was making a fire out doors, .Jerry came and put a piece of paper into the fire and went and set down. After a little he said "Good bye, Boots, I am going to die,' and commenced to tremble and shake for a. few moments, then appeared to.be sensible for a while, but soon commenced to shake again.— After a little he lay down on his face. Boots told him to go in the shade. "No,""he said, "I'm in the sun now." Boots, supposing him to be in a drunken fit, took him up and helped him into the slaughter house, alongside of the brewery, and put some clothes under his head for a pillow, and left him there to sleep it out. About 2 o'clock he went in to see him, and he was struggling his last. J.M.

Source: Waukesha Plaindealer | Waukesha, Wisconsin | Tuesday, August 21, 1866 | Page 3

*Who owned the "slaughter house"? Boots or relative, and why next to a brewery?

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1867 Ephraim Boots, brewery, 1/4 acre, Value $200; separate Shop listing on 1/8 acre valued $40.

1868 Ephraim Boots, brewery, 1 1/4 acres, including House, Value $375.

Note: Waukesha Plaindealer | Waukesha, Wisconsin | Tuesday, November 16, 1869 | Page 3

GOOD BEER - Mr. E. Boots, of the Sussex Brewery, is now furnishing lager beer to several retail dealers in this village (Waukesha), and all pronounce it a first class article. [Boots was producing enough product to transport and distribute it to retailers, miles away.]

also - Tamarack Land and Timber For Sale. The subscriber has 34 acres of well timbered Tamarack Land, located on the north-east quarter of the southeast quarter of section ten, of Lisbon, which he will sell at a bargain, or will sell the Timber only, E. Boots, Sussex, Nov. 1869. [Note: Mr. Boots was involved in other financial ventures. This parcel may have belonged to his father-in-law, William Weaver, at one time. William had a 40 acre parcel next to it in Sec 11.]

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[Feb 8, 1869 - Abstract of Title 2-19, 30/168: E. Boots to Bernard Hasler, unknown; could this be the Bernhard or Bernard W. Hephen ??? Boots begins brewering lager style beer in 1868, and he probably needed a German to help with the brewing process?]

[Also Abstract of Title 2-19, 38/617: E. Boots to S. Stocker and P. Bast]

1870 Ephraim Boots, brewery, 1 1/4 acres, $400.

1871 Ephraim Boots, brewery, 1 1/4 acres, $400.

1872 Ephraim Boots, brewery, 1 1/4 acres, $400.

1873 Ephraim Boots, brewery, 1 1/4 acres, $600.

Note: The brewery is prominently placed on an 1873 property plat map, but has almost disappeared in the 1893 edition, appearing there unlabeled. (The extended Boots family is still there, though.) By the late 1890s, the Boots Brewery was out of business.

Note: Stories have it that Boots had some cellars below his brewery. They had vaulted ceilings lined with thick limestone rock. There was a constant temperature around 54 degrees according to early accounts. The late Jerome Mudlitz said in the 1920s, when he was a kid, that he played in these cellars with his childhood friends. He mentioned two entrances. One in the brewery and another from the outside. He estimated they were 25 feet below the ground and completely lined with Lannon stone. Its rounded ceilings were 10 feet high, and the facility was 150 feet long.

The brewery cooled and stored beer barrels in its basement-cave. Jerome Mudlitz used to roam the area around the brewery in his early youth and remembered the destroyed brewery and the "deep Lannon-stone arched caves" [More than one?].

The caves were accessible from both the brewery and an outside entrance, he said, but when Alfred Otto built a home on the site in the 1930s, the caves disappeared. The caves were cool, he said, down in the 50s both summer and winter because they were so deep.

People from those days say the demise of the brewery was hastened by the coming of the railroads, which brought superior beers from the great Milwaukee breweries.

A Wisconsin beer-bottle collector, Henry Hecker, stated in 1981 that he had been trying for years to get a Boots Beer bottle or clay crock jar, but ultimately came to the conclusion that the beer had never been bottled, only sold in barrels, and that none of those had been saved.

Note: In a side note, Ephraim served as the Master of the Sussex Ashlar Lodge from 1880-81.

Source: Ephraim Boots, Sussex Brewery in the 1800s Photos from the collection of Sussex Village Historian Fred H. Keller, Sussex Sun, May 15, 2012

also

"Sussex Brewery once flourished But quality slowed the hopping firm" by Cynthia Dennis, of The Journal Staff, The Milwaukee Journal, November 27, 1980, page 31 and 34. Contribution from Fred H. Keller.

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1875 Ephraim Boots, brewery, 1 1/4 acres, $500.

1876 Ephraim Boots, brewery and house, 1 1/4 acres, $700.; also 1876 - Henry Boots, saloon, 3/4 acre, Sec. 23., Value $470.

[Aug 26, 1876 - Chattel Mortgage: Boots to Samuel Stocker and Peter Bast; reason?]

1877 Ephraim Boots, brewery and house, 1 1/4 acres, $700

1878 Ephraim Boots, brewery and house, 1 1/4 acres, $800

[Sept 27, 1878 - Chattel Mortgage: Extension filed for Samuel Stocker]

1879 No Ephraim Boots listed; perhaps owned by James Weaver?

[July 9, 1879 - Abstract of Title 2-19, 42/208: E. Boots to Michael Stadler, involving 1/4 acre]

Note: Boots went to work for brewer Stephen Stone. He took over operation management/ownership of the brewery in 1861-62 [but probably didn't satisfy the mortgage until June 1864] and ran it until 1882 (?)]

Note: 1880 Lisbon, Ephraim Boots, age 49 is listed as a "Brewer" ; his father Edward, "Works in brewery"].when he went to Janesville, Wis. to open the Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co. branch agency there.

[Feb 12, 1880 - Chattel Mortgage: Boots to William Weaver; reason ?]

[June 22, 1880 - Chattle Mortgage: John Schroeder to Henry Boots]

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[July 8, 1881 - Chattel Mortgage: Joseph Dvork to Castenholly(?)] At this point in time it does appear that Ephraim Boots sold the brewery to Jos. Dvork as was indicted early in this article - see below:

Jos. Dvorak 1880-1884, Source: American Breweries II by Dale P. Van Wieren, 1995.

Note: In 1880 Fed Census there are numerous Jos. Dvoraks [most orig from Bohemia or Czechoslovakia], none living in Waukesha County, nor any Jos Dvorak being in the brewery business. A Jos Dvorak did live in Racine County, who later commited suicide.

Note: After searching through the property deed records at the Waukesha County Register of Deeds office on November 28, 2012, I found no evidence of property purchase transactions occurring between Mr. Dvorak and any Weaver, Stone, or Boots individual. His name isn't given at all within this first four Vols of Abstract Title 1, 2, 3, 4-19.

Editor Notes: On Tuesday and Wednesday, August 6 and 7, 2013, I reviewed the town of Lisbon record book, "Chattel Mortgages, Bill of Sale, Agreements, Settlements, Feb. 13, 1860 - Aug. 8, 1923", at the Lisbon Town Hall, with the following results:

July 8, 1881 Joseph Dvorak to Castenholly (?), Chattle Mortgage

Joseph Dvork may then have run the Sussex Brewery from about 1880 to 1884.

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1882: Article on Schlitz Brewing Co growth; talks about Ephriam Boots opened the Schlitz branch agency there in 1882. He receives "beer in refrigerator cars, which are owned by the company" then supplies the trade in the Janesville area. Source: Janesville Gazette | Janesville, Wisconsin | Saturday, June 20, 1891 | Page 3

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April 1883 - Ephraim Boots is in Waukesha Freeman newspaper's delinquent tax list.

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June 1883 - Samuel Stocker and Peter Bast versus Ephraim and Esther Boots and Sebastian, Carol, Ludwig, Joseph and Johann Stadler, heirs of Michael Stadler. Involves property in Sec. 23, and a mortgage of $1,300.

[It's unknown how these people fit in the brewery's history. They may have been creditors owed money by Boots.]

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1884 - Waukesha Free Press: A fire partially destroyed Henry Boots saloon.

[April 10, 1884 - Abstract of Title 3-19, 61/437: E. Boots to O. J. Fiebring, ???]

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1887, May 28 - Waukesha Free Press: The tenant house opposite the brewery caught fire. House owned by Edward Champney.

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Note: From this point on, it's doubtful that the brewery is in operation, and someone is residing in it, or using it for other reasons.

[Jan 14, 1886 - Abstract of Title 3-19, 62/254: Samuel Stoker and Elizabeth Bast to Aden Wildish] Brewery change of ownership? Though not in operation?

Waukesha Free Press, February 7, 1891: The old brewery having been sold, they are dismantling it and tearing a part of it down, and selling the material.

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[May 8, 1895 - Abstract of Title 4-19: A. Wildish to Theodore Sounderinau (?) ]

[Jan 21, 1896 - Abstract of Title 4-19: Theodore Sounderinau(?) and wife to Henry Hauler]

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May 18, 1908 - Ester Boots, house and lot, SW 1/4 Sec.23, Tn 8 R 19, 3/4 acres to F. G. Boots [another entry May 16, 1911]

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Waukesha Freeman | Waukesha, Wisconsin | Thursday, August 31, 1911 | Page 5

W. J. Brown is adding another story to part of the old brewery by taking off the old roof and putting a hip roof in its stead.

[1906-1915 Abstract of Title 5-19: No mention of a Mr. Brown]

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About Edward Sims - Obit

Nearly a Century Old

At the advanced age of 98 years and 10 months, Edward Sims passed away in death on Monday, Jan. 29th, at his home in North Lake.

Mr. Sims was one of the first settlers and was said to be the oldest person in the county. He was born in Old Romney, Kent, England, on March 29, 1807, and came to this country seventy years ago, remaining in New York state for three years after arrival. He then pushed west and located at Lisbon, this county, where he lived for some years before settling at North Lake.

The funeral was held on Wednesday afternoon at St. Peter's Episcopal church, the Rev. Mr. Roberts of Sussex, officiating. A wife and one son survive.

Source: Waukesha Freeman February 8, 1906, page 8 of 8

Note: Sims arrived in America either 1834 or 1837, and in 1840 lived in Madison County, New York just east of the Weavers when they lived in Oneida Co. He was born in Kent Co., England so he may have know the Weaver family, and he was probably involved in hop growing or beer brewing. When he moved to the town of Lisbon, he's situated near the Weaver families.


About Ephraim Boots

Notes: from Fred H. Keller article:

Ephraim Boots was born Jan. 7, 1831, in Sussex, England. When he was 19, [1850] he followed his extended family to Sussex-Lisbon. He soon married the slightly older Eleanor Weaver [born Sept 3, 1829, in England]. She was the first daughter and second child of William Weaver Sr. and his wife, Mary Smith.

Editor Notes:

Boots went to work for brewer Stephen Stone. He took over ownership of the brewery in 1861-62 [but probably didn't satisfy the mortgage until late 1864] and ran it until 1882 [Note: 1880 Lisbon, Ephraim Boots, age 49 is listed as a "Brewer" ; his father Edward, "Works in brewery"].when he went to Janesville, Wis. to open the Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co. branch agency there. Stone had probably made English-type ales, porters and stouts, but Boots appears to have converted to German-style lager, using locally grown barley and hops.

Note: Whether Boots went to work at the brewery for either Richard Weaver or Stephen Stone isn't clear; what is certain is he entered into an agreement with James Weaver on March 9, 1860, in which he agrees to operate Mr. Weaver's saw mill, agreeing in an "Articles of Agreement" that he will operate said saw mill, and provide James Weaver with the first 50,000 ft of lumber in the year 1860, then again in 1861. After which time, Mr. Weaver will quit claim the saw mill over to Mr. Boots. {So is Ephraim Boots only managing the saw mill and working part time at the brewery? I would think he would have had to spend some time at the brewery since Richard Weaver and his wife Rhoda sold the brewery to him on October 21, 1861 [see Abstract Title 1-19, vol 27, page 342]. James Weaver and his wife Elizabeth are also selling 2.4 acres to Mr. Boots on this same day [Vol 27, page 343. Meanwhile there are alos transactions going on between the Weavers and Stephen Stone, and not until June 24, 1864 does Stephen Stone transact the property over to Mr. Boots Later in 1869 or thereabouts, there are several property transaction made to correct previous ones.

Question - What was James Weaver going to do with 100,000 ft of lumber?

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Ephriam Boots, who resides at 155 Linn Street, had narrow escape from death after his Blatz Brewing Company delivery wagon was hit at the North Western railway tracks crossing.

[Mr. Boots left Schlitz, who successfully sued him for breach of contract, and went to work for Val Blatz]

Janesville Daily Gazette | Janesville, Wisconsin | Monday, March 11, 1901 | Page 5

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In 1905 he's an agent for the Miller Brewing Co.

Janesville Daily Gazette | Janesville, Wisconsin | Wednesday, January 04, 1905 | Page 2

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In the 1930’s, local businessman Alfred Otto built a Lannon-stone house on the site of the former brewery, whose address today is W239 N6638 Maple Ave., or owned in 2012 by:

Adolph & Leona Becker, Irrevocable Family Trust aka A&L Becker Family LLC, 7282 Vine St, Po Box 236, Lannon, WI. 53046.

Legal Description: PT SW1/4 SEC 23 T8N R19E COR N 1450.39 FT THE BGN N89 deg 46'E 334.11 FT N 64.82 FT S89 deg 46'W 125.40 FT N 15.84 FT N62 deg 44W 234.80 FT S 189.17 FT to BGN 0.829 AC DOC # 3690454 & DOC# 3690455

Property Value 2012: Total $172,500.00

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