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Genealogy: Family Histories

Alfred Wileden Family

   Compiled and Edited by Michael R. Reilly

Last Revised 01/10/2016

     The Alfred Wileden family was photographed about 1900. This Sussex-Lisbon family has many relatives living today (Apr. 1978) in the area. Front row, L to R; Ida (Rosier), Angelica (Brown), Silvia (Kerr), and Alfred. Second Row, L to R; Charles, Grace (Stone), Horace, the oldest child and Elsie. Alfred was a mason and a farmer living on Good Hope Rd. Source: Sussex Sun, Tuesday, April 4, 1978

Descendants of Alfred Wileden

Generation No. 1

 

1. ALFRED1 WILEDEN was born July 11, 1838 in Headcorn, England (Source: Waukesha Freeman, July 27, 1916, p.8., Alfred's obit.). He married ANGELICA "GELICA" BROWN June 13, 1869 (Source: Waukesha Freeman, July 27, 1916, p.8., Alfred's obit.). She died 1936 (Source: Waukesha Freeman, December 2, 1936.).

Notes for ALFRED WILEDEN:

Alfred Wileden, the youngest child in a family of fifteen, was born in Headcorn, England, July 11, 1838. At the age of 18 he came with his parents to America and lived for a time in New York state. Later a residence was taken up in Michigan. In 1861 he removed to Waukesha County, Wisconsin, where he continued to reside until the time of his death.

On June 12, 1869, he was united in marriage to Angelia Brown, who still survives, with six of the eight children who blessed this union: Horace F;, Charles A., Mrs. Elsie Hardiman, Mrs. Grace Stone and Mrs. Sylvia Kerr, all of Lisbon, and Mrs. Ida Rosier of Oshkosh.

Mr. Wileden was a stone mason by trade and through having done work on nearly every farm in this vicinity, came to have a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

For the last few years failing health has been his portion, but these declining years have been brightened by loving ministry of kindly deeds and frequent visits by those dear to him. Death came to him on the evening of July 20th, at the age of 78 years and 9 days.

The immediate family of bereaved ones include a loving wife, two sons and four daughters, fourteen grandchildren, besides one sister and one brother residing in New York and Michigan, respectively.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon, July 23, at 2 o'clock at the home, Rev. Mr. Schlagenhauf officiating. Mr. Wileden was laid to rest beside his mother and two daughters at Rose Hill cemetery, Lisbon. In this hour of grief the pastor commended those who mourn to the all-wise and loving Heavenly Father, bidding them to remember the comforting assurance of the Psalmist, which says: "As the mountains are round Jerusalem, so is the Lord round his about his people, from this time forth and for evermore." - (Psa. 125:2.)

"I cannot say, I will say

That he is dead, he is just away."

More About ALFRED WILEDEN:

Burial: July 23, 1916, Rose Hill Cemetery, Town of Lisbon, Waukesha, Wisconsin (Source: Waukesha Freeman, July 27, 1916, p.8., Alfred's obit.)

Emigration: Abt. 1856, At age 18 his parents came to America and settled for a time in New York State (Source: Waukesha Freeman, July 27, 1916, p.8., Alfred's obit.)

Occupation: Stone Mason

Residence 1: Bef. 1856, England

Residence 2: Abt. 1856, New York state

Residence 3: Bef. 1861, Michigan

Residence 4: Aft. 1861, Lisbon, Waukesha, Wisconsin

More About ALFRED WILEDEN and ANGELICA BROWN:

Marriage: June 13, 1869 (Source: Waukesha Freeman, July 27, 1916, p.8., Alfred's obit.)

 

Children of ALFRED WILEDEN and ANGELICA BROWN are:

2. i. ELSIE2 WILEDEN.

ii. GRACE WILEDEN, m. ? STONE.

3. iii. IDA WILEDEN.

iv. MINA WILEDEN, b. Abt. 1871.

v. CHARLES WILEDEN, b. 1874.

4. vi. HORACE WILEDEN, b. Abt. 1881.

vii. MYRTLE WILEDEN, b. 1885.

viii. SILVIA WILEDEN, b. Abt. 1887; m. CHARLES BYRON KERR, December 28, 1907, Alfred Wileden home, Town of Lisbon (Source: Waukesha Freeman, January 9, 1908, p. 4.).

More About CHARLES KERR and SILVIA WILEDEN:

Marriage: December 28, 1907, Alfred Wileden home, Town of Lisbon (Source: Waukesha Freeman, January 9, 1908, p. 4.)

 

Generation No. 2

 

2. ELSIE2 WILEDEN (ALFRED1) She married WALTER S. HARDIMAN, son of STEPHEN HARDIMAN and ANN ?. He was born Abt. 1879 (Source: 1880 Federal Census, age 1.).

Notes for ELSIE WILEDEN:

The Grandmother's Chorus, members, Mrs. Walter Hardiman, Mrs. Milo. Leo Howard is the director. Waukesha Freeman, June 26, 1940 Also member of The West Sussex group of the Home Economics Club (Mrs. Walter)

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WOMAN companion in exchange for room and board. Write or phone Mrs. Elsie Hardiman, Sussex. Waukesha Freeman, July 7, 1952

More About ELSIE WILEDEN:

Membership: a member of Past Matron's club

Notes for WALTER S. HARDIMAN:

Three young men were arraigned in municipal court here today charged with stealing a flock of 30 chickens from Walter Hardiman, town of Lisbon famer. WF April 21, 1932

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Waukesha Freeman, November 6, 1935 - first mention of the "Hardiman Oils"; a bowling team playing in Pewaukee's Bowling Club.

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Ray Schroeder, who has driven truck for the Hardiman Oil company since their going into business several years ago, has severd his connection with the company and has accepted a position with the Pate Oil company of Waukesha. Waukesha Freeman, August 21, 1940

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The "Blue Shadows" orchestra played "Let Me Call You Sweetheart" at Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hardiman's 40th Anniversary at St. Alban's Guild Hall on Sept. 26, 1940 at 8:30p.m.

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Walter had his wallet stolen at the Wisconsin Council of Agriculture in La Crosse along with three other men. Waukesha Freeman, November 19, 1941

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Hardiman Oil company named class A tire inspection center by OPA. Waukesha Freeman, December 23, 1942

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Hardiman Oil company entertained 18 employees and ? with a steak dinner at Brook hotel. Waukesha Freeman, November 24, 1943

More About WALTER S. HARDIMAN:

Life Events: October 1929, Had quantity of potatoes stolen at night; thieves hitting apple trees and potatoes in area. (Source: Waukesha Freeman, Oct. 24, 1929.)

Masonic 1: December 30, 1920, Elected Junior Warden of Ashlar Lodge No. 193, F & A. M.

Masonic 2: April 14, 1921, President of Beet Growers Association

Membership 1: 1945, Secretary of Lisbon Mutual Insurance Company

Membership 2: a director of the Golden Guerney cooperative

Membership 3: Member of executive board of the Wisconsin Council of Agriculture.

Membership 4: January 1929, Elected director of Lisbon Mutual Insurance company (Source: Waukesha Freeman, Jan. 17, 1929.)

Membership 5: July 1935, Elected Sussex school (board/PTA?) treasurer (Source: Waukesha Freeman, July 10, 1935.)

Occupation 1: July 06, 1938, Term "Hardiman Oil Company" first seen in Waukesha Freeman newspaper.

Occupation 2: May 1939, The Hardiman Oil company has moved to the Paul Schroeder Garage across from the bank. The Sinclair Oil company is taking possession of the building vacated by the Hardiman Oil company. (Source: Waukesha Freeman, May 3, 1939.)

Political 1: 1919, Pewaukee Town Clerk

Political 2: 1920, Town of Lisbon Treasurer

Residence 1: April 1900, Living in South Milwaukee (Source: Waukesha Freeman, April 19, 1900.)

Residence 2: September 1906, Purchased house of James Elliott, opposite the creamery. (Source: Waukesha Freeman, Sept. 6, 1906.)

Residence 3: September 24, 1908, William Howard has rented Walter Hardiman's residence (Source: Waukesha Freeman, Sept. 24, 1908.)

 

Children of ELSIE WILEDEN and WALTER HARDIMAN are:

5. i. PERCY S.3 HARDIMAN, b. June 07, 1909; d. April 1987.

ii. RALPH M. HARDIMAN, b. September 10, 1902 (Source: Waukesha 0301 000233.); d. 1965; m. LAURA SHOCKLEY, August 15, 1931, First Reformed Church, Waukesha, Wisconsin.

Notes for RALPH M. HARDIMAN:

The marriage of Miss Laura Shockley, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Shockley, Waukesha, to Ralph Hardiman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hardiman, Sussex, occurred Saturday, August, 15, at 4 o'clock p.m. at the parsonage of the First Reformed church, Rev. H. G. Settlage performing the service.

The bride wore a green net dress with a corresponding hat and carried a bouquet of pink roses and larkspur. She was attended by Kathryn Chapman, Waukesha, who was attired in peach satin with hat to match and carried a bouquet of peach roses and larkspur.

The groom was attended by his brother, Percy Hardiman, Sussex.

After the ceremony a dinner was given by the bride's parents at their home for immediate families. After a trip through the northern part of the state and Canada, the couple will make their home at Sussex. Waukesha Freeman, August 20, 1931

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Appointed tire inspector by Waukesha county rationing board for Sussex. Waukesha Freeman, March 18, 1942

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Ralph named assistant on Waukesha County implement dealer's salvage drive covering Town of Lisbon. Waukesha Freeman, August 12, 1942

 

More About RALPH M. HARDIMAN:

Residence 1: September 15, 1937, Bought lot on eastside of Sussex (Source: Waukesha Freeman, Sept 15, 1937.)

Residence 2: March 23, 1938, Moved into new house on Sussex eastside. (Source: Waukesha Freeman, March 23, 1938.)

Notes for LAURA SHOCKLEY:

Parents and sister living in Decatur, Il. Waukesha Freeman, Dec. 31, 1941 Has a sister, Mrs. Benish, living in Prairie du Chien.

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Another sister is Mrs. Harry Hansen of Decatur, IL.

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Had an appendectomy at Waukesha on Friday. Waukesha Freeman, January 24, 1945

 

More About RALPH HARDIMAN and LAURA SHOCKLEY:

Marriage: August 15, 1931, First Reformed Church, Waukesha, Wisconsin

Minister: Rev. H. G. Settlage

6. iii. WALTER MILO HARDIMAN, b. 1905; d. May 1962.

 

3. IDA2 WILEDEN (ALFRED1) She married WALTER ROSIER, son of AARON ROSIER and JOSPHINE WEAVER.

 

Child of IDA WILEDEN and WALTER ROSIER is:

i. VERNON3 ROSIER.

 

4. HORACE2 WILEDEN (ALFRED1) was born Abt. 1881.

 

Child of HORACE WILEDEN is:

i. RUTH3 WILEDEN.

Ruth Wileden, almost 99, dies
By Fred Keller, Sussex Sun Staff writer, January 03, 2001

Ruth Elizabeth Wileden lived all her long life in Sussex and Lisbon, except for the past four years when she retired to a nursing home in Brookfield. If she had lived five more weeks, she would have celebrated her 99th birthday.

Ruth Elizabeth Wileden lived all her long life in Sussex and Lisbon, except for the past four years when she retired to a nursing home in Brookfield. If she had lived five more weeks, she would have celebrated her 99th birthday.

The Wileden family came to the town of Lisbon in 1877. They had a 62-acre farm on Good Hope Road that in recent years was owned by descendents Ruby Stone Kazmerchak and her daughter Donna Zimmerman. The Zimmermans have received a Wisconsin Century Farm certificate for the over-100 years that the farm belonged to the extended Wileden family.

Donna always kidded Ruth that the modern use of the farmhouse bedroom, which Ruth was born in, was the computer room for the Zimmerman family.

Ruth was born to Horace and Nellie (nee Schaaf) Wileden on Jan. 30, 1902, in the still-existing farmhouse.

There were two brothers ahead of her, Arthur and George. The Horace Wileden family moved around, once on a farm on Woodside Road that later became the Wierl farm and now the northernmost new addition to Sussex being developed into a subdivision just north of Ridgeview subdivision.

However, the longest and most prominent farm the Wiledens lived on, and where Ruth spent most of her young life, was what is today the eastern part of Eagles Ridge subdivision off Clover Drive.

In the late 1930s, the remnants of the Wileden family, including George and Ruth, bought an old farmstead at present day W239 N6548 Maple Ave., Sussex Village, which is now Dan and Mary Nettesheim's home.

George ran his excavating and stone-hauling business out of the farm, while Ruth settled into long years of being the house lady to her bachelor brother.

When Ruth first moved into the old home, there was no indoor plumbing, a luxury she would not get until the early 1950s. In the late 1940s and '50s, land from the farm was sold off that today forms Vista Lane and the northern part of Elmwood Avenue.

Never married, she practically adopted the immediate neighbors, Ron and Pat Nettesheim and family, when they moved adjacent to her in the 1950s. In 1985 she sold her home and out buildings to the oldest son, Dan, of Ron and Pat. However, the sale of the home was somewhat different, as she retained the right to live in part of it.

Ruth would spend a lot of time at the Nettesheim home admonishing on how to cook, about politics and the duty of voting. There were also religious questions that Ruth would get into lively conversations about with Pat and Ron.

Never having children of her own, she always loved to hear the hustle and bustle of children in her neighborhood. One of the things she liked about "new Sussex" was the extension of sidewalks, both for her to walk on and for children to use.

Ruth was somewhat ahead of the curve, as she took something of a hard stance against smoking early in her life. She also fought the battle of putting fluoride into the Sussex village water supply, as she was against adding chemicals to the food chain.

Pat said every time there was an election, Ruth would call and say, "Don't forget to vote." Pat added, "From day one when we moved in, Ruth was the best of friends with us and then later in life when our son had the home and was remodeling it, she could handle the change in her life well. She loved her garden and walking. She walked every day.

"She was the best friend of Madeline Halquist when she first cam to Sussex after marrying Al in 1933. Madeline now lives in Menomonee Falls in summer and Florida in the winter, but always the last thing she did was visit Ruth before she went and the first thing after she came back," said Pat. "I know her other great friends were Grace Jones, Jane Harris, Ruby Clayton and these last few years, Mary Krug."

For many years, Ruth raised chickens on her farm, but what she was most famous for was her large organically-grown garden. She was way before her time with her push to grow organically.

Ruth sold some of her vegetables, but also sold organic products for gardening from her home, naming her little business The Garden Spot. For a period of years, she also did some bakery sales.

Four years ago, very active still at 94 years old, Ruth fell and broke her hip. She went to Care-Age Nursing Home in Brookfield.

Ruth died Wednesday, Dec. 20. A former longtime member of the Sussex Methodist Church, she became a member of the Elmbrook Church in Brookfield. A memorial service was held Dec. 27 at Elmbrook Church, with the Rev. Mel Lawrence officiating.

In lieu of flowers, Ruth asked in life that memorials be given to the mission program at Elmbrook Church.

Her parents and brothers all preceded her in death. Her closest relatives are niece, Mary (and Bob) Benning of Fond du Lac, and nephew, John (and Donna) Wileden of Madison. She also leaves many friends.

The Wileden family of the Lisbon-Sussex area since 1877 is now almost gone from the local scene.

Generation No. 3

 

5. PERCY S.3 HARDIMAN (ELSIE2 WILEDEN, ALFRED1) was born June 07, 1909, and died April 1987. He married ADELINE KETTLEWELL June 30, 1934 in Chapel of Ripon College, Ripon, Wisconsin, daughter of ? KETTLEWELL and ?. She was born April 01, 1909, and died August 1987 in Dousman, Waukesha, Wisconsin (Source: SSDI.).

Notes for PERCY S. HARDIMAN:

A pretty wedding took place in the Chapel of Ripon College, on Saturday afternoon, June 30 when Miss Adeline Kettlewell of Berlin became the bride of Percy Hardiman of this village. Hilas Evans, president of Ripon College performing the ceremony.

The bride wore a very becoming dress of blue satin, embroidered net over the blue satin, with pale blue suede slippers and large picture hat, and carried a corsage bouquet of sweet peas, ferns and baby breath. Following the ceremony, the bridal party

went to Berlin, where a 6:30 p.m. wedding dinner at the Hotel Whitney was served to the immediate families. The bridal couple left for an auto honeymoon trip of several weeks to Glacier and Yellowstone Parks, and the Black Hills. They will make their home in this village where they plan to build a new home in the near future.

Those who attended the wedding included Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hardiman, Mr. and Mrs. Milo hardiman, and Joe Ries. The bride had been teaching in the Sussex school for the past three years. Waukesha Freeman, July 4, 1934

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At the request of the Cosden Oil company at Pewaukee, the local Cosden Oil company, entered the parade at Pewaukee on Labor Day. Percy Hardiman's oil truck was decorated and rode in the parade. The first prize however was captured by the second entry from the local company. Joe Ries, dressed in clothes of a fashion worn many years ago, accompanied by Mesdames Walter

Hardiman, Ralph Hardiman and Walter Rosier, also dressed in fashions of long ago, drove the vehicle, also of questionable age or make which is often seen on our streets and which is composed of a surrey body and auto chassis. The vehicle was also appropriately decorated for the occasion. Because of the rain Monday, the crowd was not as large as usual at the parade, but those who were there gave many cheers at the sight of the ancient picture. Waukesha Freeman, September 5, 1934.

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Waukesha Freeman, October 9, 1935 - Bishop Ivins of Milwaukee conducted Confirmation services at St. Alban's church on Sunday morning. The candidates included: Mr. and Mrs. Percy Hardiman, and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Hardiman.

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Mr. and Mrs. Christ Bucher have moved into the Percy Hardiman home acquired through the sale of their farm [near Mapleton] to Mr. Hardiman. Waukesha Freeman, June 12, 1940

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Percy broke upper part of his foot while operating some machinery on the farm in North Lake. Waukesha freeman, June 4, 1941

 

More About PERCY S. HARDIMAN:

Membership: March 1955, Supervisor in the Waukesha County Soil Conservation District. Waukesha Freeman, March 14, 1955

Occupation: May 1939, Appointed Constable of Sussex, that office having been mad vacant by the moving to Merton of Gilbert Riewe who was elected recently. (Source: Waukesha Freeman, May 3, 1939.)

Residence 1: July 1945, North Lake, Waukesha, Wisconsin

Residence 2: August 22, 1934, Purchased the home of Mrs. Abbie Bertleson (Source: Waukesha Freeman, August 22, 1934.)

Residence 3: June 1940, Mr. and Mrs. Christ Bucher have moved into the Percy Hardiman home acquired through the sale of their farm [near Mapleton] to Mr. Hardiman. Waukesha Freeman, June 12, 1940

Residence 4: June 1942, Rural Rt. 1, Hartland. Waukesha Freeman, June 24, 1942

More About ADELINE KETTLEWELL:

Occupation 1: Bet. 1931 - 1934, The bride had been teaching in the Sussex school for the past three years. (Source: Waukesha Freeman, July 4, 1934.)

Occupation 2: March 1939, Working as a substitute teacher at Lannon School (Source: Waukesha Freeman, March 29, 1939.)

More About PERCY HARDIMAN and ADELINE KETTLEWELL:

Marriage: June 30, 1934, Chapel of Ripon College, Ripon, Wisconsin

Minister: Hilas Evans, President of Ripon College

 

Children of PERCY HARDIMAN and ADELINE KETTLEWELL are:

i. DEAN STEPHEN4 HARDIMAN, b. August 26, 1937, St. Joseph's Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

More About DEAN STEPHEN HARDIMAN:

Baptism (LDS): Abt. December 05, 1937, St. Alban's Church, Sussex, Waukesha, Wisconsin

Birth Information: Weighed 8 lbs.

ii. JO ANNE (JOSEPHINE) HARDIMAN (Source: Waukesha Freeman, Nov. 8, 1939 issue gives her name as Josephine not Jo Anne as when she died.), b. November 1939, St. Mary's Hospital, Milwaukee (Source: Waukesha Freeman, Nov. 8, 1939.); d. July 1945, Children's Hospital, Milwaukee.

Notes for JO ANNE (JOSEPHINE) HARDIMAN:

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Percy Hardiman was baptized Josephine Ann at the morning services at St. Alban's church on Sunday, the Rev. Parmiter officiating. Mrs. Walter Hardiman was the sponsor. Following the services, Mr. and Mrs. Percy Hardiman entertained Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hardiman, and Mrs. Adams and daughter, Fay Lucille, of Wauwatosa at a delicious chicken dinner at the Brook hotel. Waukesha Freeman, February 14, 1940

Daughter is called "Joanne". Waukesha Freeman, August 7, 1940

Funeral services were held at St. Alban's church Monday afternoon for little Jo Anne Hardiman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Percy Hardiman of North lake. She would have been six years of age in November. She was taken ill about three weeks ago with an almost incurable sickness, and was taken to the Children's Hospital in Milwaukee, where everything possible was done for her recovery. A slight improvement the middle of last week raised the hopes of the loving relatives, but on Friday afternoon, death won the battle.

Besides her parents, she is survived by a younger sister, Harriet, two grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hardiman, uncles, aunts and cousins. A brother, Dean, preceded her in death. The Hardiman family are former residents of this village (Sussex). WF July 18, 1945

More About JO ANNE (JOSEPHINE) HARDIMAN:

Burial: St. Alban's Cemetery (God's Acre), Sussex, Waukesha, Wisconsin

iii. HARRIET JEAN HARDIMAN, b. June 20, 1942, Waukesha Memorial Hospital.

Notes for HARRIET JEAN HARDIMAN:

Harriet Jane baptized at St. Alban's, at Sunday morning service; also was infant daughter of Frederick Stier. Waukesha Freeman, November 18, 1942

 

6. WALTER MILO3 HARDIMAN (ELSIE2 WILEDEN, ALFRED1) was born 1905, and died May 1962. He married HELEN CHRISTINA SMITH, daughter of CHARLES GUMM. She was born January 22, 1906 (Source: SSDI.), and died June 21, 1992.

Notes for WALTER MILO HARDIMAN:

Helen Smith Weds Walter Hardiman

Lisbon - A very pretty wedding was solemnized at the Sussex Methodist-Episcopal church last Wednesday at 4 p.m. when Miss Helen Christina Smith, daughter of Mrs. C. Gumm of this village, became the wife of Milo Walter Hardiman, son of Mr. and Mrs Walter M. Hardiman, Lisbon. The Rev. C. Wilkinson performed the double ring ceremony. The church was beautifully decorated with ferns and cut flowers. The wedding march was played by Miss Irma Lingelbach. The bride wore a gown of white geogette over satin, trimmed with lace. The veil was embroidered net held with rhinestones and pearls. Miss Merle Stone, Templeton, was the maid of honor and wore a gown of pink taffeta. Miss Hilda Schroeder, Sussex, and Miss Isabelle Felsing, Milwaukee, were bridesmaids and wore gowns of pale green and yellow taffeta.

Ralph Hardiman, brother of the groom, was best man, and Percy Hardiman and Vernon Rosier, Oshkosh, were attendants. Homer Stone and LaVerne Clarey were ushers. Little Kathleen Delany and Betty Engel in peach and blue crepe were flower girls and carried mixed bouquets. The bride carried a shower bouquet of white roses and babies breath. The attendants carried colored roses.

A reception was held at the Masonic Temple and supper was served to ninety. The couple left Wednesday night on a trip which include Madison, Rice Lake, Tomahawk, and Pine River, Wis., and Port Arthur, Minn. They will be at home after September 1st, in their new home in Sussex.

Waukesha Freeman, August 25, 1927

Milo enjoyed two day vacation from milk route. Waukesha Freeman, August 23, 1944

 

More About WALTER MILO HARDIMAN:

Burial: Rose Hill Cemetery, Town of Lisbon, Waukesha, Wisconsin

Illness/Accidents: Abt. December 17, 1908, Had hand badly crushed in a corn sheller. (Source: Waukesha Freeman, December 17, 1908.)

Membership: Bet. 1955 - 1956, President, Sussex Lions Club

Occupation 1: May 1932, Deputy Sheriff (Source: Waukesha Freeman, May 5, 1932.)

Occupation 2: November 1940, Manager of Sussex Lannon Stone company. Waukesha Freeman, November 6, 1940

Occupation 3: August 1944, Milo enjoyed two day vacation from milk route. Waukesha Freeman, August 23, 1944

Political 1: Bet. 1928 - 1959, Sussex village Clerk for 31 yrs.

Political 2: April 1932, Sussex village treasurer (Source: Waukesha Freeman, WF April 14, 1932.)

Notes for HELEN CHRISTINA SMITH:

Meeting of the WSCS of the Methodist church held at Mrs. Milo Hardiman 's home, helped by mother Mrs. Charles Gumm.

Waukesha Freeman, April 16, 1941

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Went to St. Mary's in Milwaukee for observation and an operation this week. Waukesha Freeman, May 30, 1945

More About HELEN CHRISTINA SMITH:

Membership 1: January 10, 1934, OES meeting - Helen Hardiman

Membership 2: member of the Thursday Afternoon club

 

Child of WALTER HARDIMAN and HELEN SMITH is:

i. KERYL (CAROL) JEAN4 HARDIMAN, m. GLEN F. MOODY.

Notes for KERYL (CAROL) JEAN HARDIMAN:

Working as beautician at Duchess Beauty Shop, 267 W. Main St., Waukesha, Phone 3965. Waukesha Freeman, July 21, 1952

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Keryl Jean Hardiman Becomes Bride of A/3c Glen F. Moody Sussex Methodist church was the scene at three o'clock toda, of the wedding of Miss Keryl Jean Hardiman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Milo Hardiman, Old Mill Lane, Sussex, and A/3c Glen F. Moody, McGhee Tyson airport, Knoxville, Tenn., His parents are Mr. and Mrs. Milton Moody, Elmwood Ave., Sussex. An evening reception will be held at Sussex Community Hall.

The Rev. Edward langdon performed the ceremony, Mrs. Albert Meissner, Merton, was the soloist and Mrs. William Blank, the organist.

White nylon tulle and embroidered nylon lace formed the bridal gown of Miss Hardiman. Lace formed the fitted bodice with a portrait effect on an illusion yoke edged with scallops at the base and snug fitted neckline. Her long lace sleeves tapered to points and the same lace formed wide panels in the full skirt with a sweep. Alace and pleated illusion Juliet cap edged in

pearls held her scalloped rolled edge fingertip veil. She carried a white Bible with a white orchid and lilies of the valley resting on it.

Miss Theodora Van Valin, the bride's cousin, was her maid of honor. Her blue organza gown, in full length, was in torso mode with abow at the back and folds of the same fabric at the bodice top and over the shoulders. Miss Betty Manke and Miss Karen Fagen, both of Sussex, wore gowns identical to Miss Van Valin's, while those of the two junior bridesmaids, Harriet Hardiman, the bride's cousin and Sally Moody, the groom's sister, were the same style in pink. All the girls wore crowns of white stephanotis and held nosegays of stephanotis and pink rosebuds. Kathleen Blank, the flowergirl, carried a basket of sweet peas and roses.

Attendants for the groom were Robert Clarey, the best man; Richard Zimmerman, John Reimer and James Van Valin, the ushers. James Marx served as the ring bearer.

Mrs. Hardiman, the bride's mother wore a blue nylon lace over taffeta with a white hat and accessories. Her corsage was an orchid. Mrs. Moody, the groom's mother was attired in a gray suit with avocado hat and accessories and she also wore an orchid.

Both of the young couple are Waukesha High School graduates. The bride is a graduate of the Milwaukee Accredited School of Beauty Culture. They will spend their honeymoon en route to Tennessee where they will make their home temporarily at Maryville. For traveling the young Mrs. Moody has chosen a short sleeved summer ensemble in gray and white frille to wear with white accessories.

Parties for the bride were given by Mrs. Charles DeLany and Mrs. Roman Engel; Miss Karen Fagen, Mrs. Walter hardiman and Mrs. Ralph Hardiman; Dr and Mrs. E. C. Van Valin, Mr. and Mrs. Percy Hardiman. Waukesha Freeman, April, 16, 1955

 

More About KERYL (CAROL) JEAN HARDIMAN:

Occupation: July 1952, Working as beautician at Duchess Beauty Shop, 267 W. Main St., Waukesha, Phone 3965. Waukesha Freeman, July 21, 1952


Source for below: http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/cgi/f/findaid/findaid-idx?c=wiarchives;cc=wiarchives;view=text;rgn=main;didno=uw-whs-tape00553a

Oral History Interview with Arthur F. Wileden, 1975

 

 
Summary Information
Title: Oral History Interview with Arthur F. Wileden
Inclusive Dates: 1975

Creator:
  • Wileden, Arthur F.
Call Number: Tape 553A

Quantity: 11 tape recordings

Repository:
Archival Locations:
Wisconsin Historical Society (Map)
 

Abstract:
Tape-recorded interviews conducted by Dale Treleven of the Wisconsin Historical Society staff with rural sociologist Arthur Wileden; concerning his youth and early teaching experiences in Waukesha County, Wis., his World War I disillusionment, his career at the University of Wisconsin and work on such projects as community leadership conferences and rural community development, rural civil defense during World War II, the development of French Island near La Crosse, the growth of several farm organizations, and the personalities and effectiveness of rural leaders he has known.

Note:

Part of the Wisconsin Agriculturalists Oral History Project.



Language: English

URL to cite for this finding aid: http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/wiarchives.uw-whs-tape00553a
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Biography/History

Born on a farm in the town of Lisbon, northwest of the village of Sussex, in Waukesha County, Wisconsin, on July 2, 1896, Arthur F. Wileden spent his youth on four different Waukesha County farms while his father (in the words of the son) attempted to “climb the agricultural ladder.” Arthur Wileden's half century of teaching, which culminated in 1966 with elevation to the rank of emeritus professor of rural sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, began at Ottawa school district #1, near Dousman, Wisconsin. Influenced considerably by elementary school teacher Henry G. Brock at the North Lisbon school, Wileden viewed the process of learning as one that extends beyond classroom walls and instinctively developed unorthodox teaching methods to put his belief into practice. Over the years his thousands of students, ranging from those enrolled in the agricultural short course to doctoral candidates at the University of Wisconsin-Madison were subjected to a teaching and research strategy that took them far beyond the walls of the classroom.

In both teaching and research, Wileden's instincts remained essentially those of a generalist as opposed to the specialized social scientist of today. Wileden's community organization research and analysis, beginning in the 1920's, by the mid-1940's had quite naturally led him into an area now called rural community development. Wileden's key ideas and contributions to the field, developed from a half century of experience and observation, are embodied in Community Development: The Dynamics of Planned Change (1970). Other publications as well as a listing of professional and personal activities are contained in Wileden's vita, filed in the Historical Society's Archives Division.

Scope and Content Note

Interview

I [interviewer Dale Treleven of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin] first approached Professor Wileden in the winter of 1975 about the possibility of holding a series of tape recorded interviews. While my chief objective was to tape Wileden about his early life in rural Waukesha County and about his many years of direct contact with rural community leaders and farmers' organizations in Wisconsin, the scope of the interviews was expanded to include many of his general reflections and remembrances about his career at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Wileden was, after all, the heir to a tradition of applied sociology established by Charles J. Galpin (the “father of rural sociology” in the United States), and continued by John H. Kolb, who fought successfully to establish an autonomous department of rural sociology. Interestingly, agricultural economist Henry C. Taylor (whose influence had led to Galpin's being added to the Madison staff to examine rural social life, conditions, and problems) several decades earlier than Kolb had been successful in establishing an agricultural economics department separate from the Department of Economics.

Professor Wileden and I began taping on February 5. We concluded on May 7, 1975, after holding nine individual sessions and recording approximately fifteen hours of interview. Typically I arrived at Wileden's Nakoma home at 9:30 A.M. and we usually began taping about fifteen or twenty minutes later after Arthur and Harriet Wileden and I had discussed current national and local affairs of mutual interest and concern. Each individual session was from ninety to 120 minutes in length. During each session, Harriet Wileden crocheted while seated in a nearby rocking chair, and occasionally contributed to the discussion or to make a slight correction to a statement made by her husband. Professor Wileden and I faced one another, the microphone placed on the foot stool that separated us. The bespectacled Wileden typically wore a checked, flannel shirt to complement everyday trousers and slippers. On his lap lay a sheaf of reference notes, compiled before each session on the basis of a listing of subject areas we had agreed upon at the end of a previous meeting. At the same time, I did not prepare any advance listing of specific questions before any of the interview sessions.

Researchers with wide-ranging interests will benefit by listening to the remembrances of one who has observed the process as keenly as he has measured a product. Those interested in the prosperous rolling farmlands in Waukesha County during the century's first two decades will learn much from Wileden's detailed descriptions of individual farm units and rural community life; others will wish to hear his comments about a short, but eye-opening period as an Army drill instructor from 1918-1919; still others will be greatly interested in Wileden's description of the emergence of rural sociology as an independent discipline at the University of Wisconsin, and how the discipline began to change in the post-World War II period. Wileden discusses in detail the underpinnings of applied sociology and describes how he and others organized and developed extension programs for state citizens in such areas as drama, music, and public speaking. Researchers will share his chagrin at the almost totally disorganized efforts to mobilize rural Wisconsin for defense during World War II, and will share his pride over the successful development of French Island, an old settlement near the city of La Crosse.

Wileden speaks freely of many with whom he was closely associated, both within and outside of the university community, including college of agriculture deans, rural sociology department chairmen, rural community leaders, and farmers. He reflects at length upon the changing role of the university, the college of agriculture, and the rural sociology department, and often expresses distinct satisfaction or profound displeasure with the turn of events over the past several decades.

Abstract to the Interview

The tapes for this interview have two tracks; a voice track containing the discussion and a time track containing time announcements at intervals of approximately five seconds. The abstract lists, in order of discussion, the topics covered on each tape, and indicates the time-marking at which point the beginning of the particular discussion appears.

Thus, the researcher by using a tape recorder's fast-forward button may find expeditiously and listen to discrete segments without listening to all of the taped discussion. For instance, the user who wishes to listen to the topic on “COMMENTS ON HENRY G. BROCK, TEACHER AT THE NORTH LISBON SCHOOL” should locate the place on the second track of tape one, side one, where the voice announces the 12:05 time-marking (the voice says at this point, “twelve minutes, five seconds”), and at this point switch to the first track to hear the discussion. The discussion on HENRY G. BROCK continues until approximately 13:10 at which point discussion of the next topic (“ANECDOTE ABOUT POOR GRADE ON COUNTY EXAM”) begins.

Notice that in most cases sentences beneath each headline explain more about the contents of the topic. For example, the sentences underneath “COMMENTS ON HENRY G. BROCK, TEACHER. . . .” give further details on what appears on the tape between 12:05 and 13:10.

The abstract is designed to provide only a brief outline of the content of the tapes and cannot serve as a substitute for listening to them. However the abstract when used with the index will help the researcher easily locate distinct topics and discussions among the many minutes of commentary.

Index to the Interview

The index, which is keyed to the same time announcement track (second track) as the abstract, gives a single alphabetical listing of all proper nouns (names of persons, places, groups, organizations, books, periodicals), and distinct historical phenomena (Depression, World War II), which appear in the abstract. Each entry is followed by one or more three- or four-part citations specifying the location(s) where the entry appears. For instance, Henry G. Brock is followed by the citation 1:1, 06;40. This indicates that a reference to Henry G. Brock appears on Tape 1, Side 1 within the time-marking beginning at six minutes, forty seconds of the time announcement.

Related Material

Copies of Professor Wileden's vita and selected publications are filed in the Archives Division. Other materials were donated to the Archives by Professor Wileden.

Administrative/Restriction Information
Acquisition Information

 


Processing Information

Finding aid prepared by Dale E. Treleven, June 20, 1977.


 
Contents List
 
2/5/75
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   01:30
BACKGROUND OF ARTHUR F. WILEDEN
Scope and Content Note: Born in 1896 on farm in town of Lisbon, northwest of Sussex in Waukesha County, Wis., homesteaded by Wileden's grandfather.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   02:45
BACKGROUND OF WILEDEN'S GRANDFATHER
Scope and Content Note: Stone mason.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   04:25
BEGINNING OF WILEDEN'S FORMAL EDUCATION
Scope and Content Note: Started attending one-room country school at age four.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   05:35
BACKGROUND OF WILEDEN'S GRANDMOTHER
Scope and Content Note: Grandmother (nee Brown) native of area, and a very active Christian Scientist leader. Mary Baker Eddy once visited the farm for a week. Although two daughters remained Christian Scientists, the remaining children became members of the Episcopal or Methodist churches.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   06:40
CONTINUATION OF DISCUSSION OF WILEDEN'S ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
Scope and Content Note: Always a one-room school, although the family moved around from farm to farm as Wileden's father moved up the “agricultural ladder,” Henry G. Brock, who taught Wileden in grades six through nine at the North Lisbon school, had “tremendous influence” on him.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   12:05
COMMENTS ON HENRY G. BROCK, TEACHER AT THE NORTH LISBON SCHOOL
Scope and Content Note: Brock “took a special liking” to Wileden, invited him back in the fall, and taught him ninth grade level courses: English, Algebra, Physical Geography and German. “He taught me more about teaching than I've ever learned.”
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   13:10
ANECDOTE ABOUT POOR GRADE ON COUNTY EXAM
Scope and Content Note: Students required to pass a county diploma examination in eleven subjects to graduate from the eighth grade. Wileden received four “100's,” but earned a “60” in spelling, because he learned to spell phonetically.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   14:00
WILEDEN'S SECONDARY EDUCATION
Scope and Content Note: In good weather rode bicycle to attend high school at Menomonee Falls, seven miles away. In winter walked two miles to the Milwaukee-St. Paul train depot at Templeton. Rode “the old bug line,” to Menomonee Falls and walked two more miles to Menomonee Falls high school. Returned home about six in evening; schedule prevented him from participating in extracurricular activities. Graduated in 1914.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   18:15
ANECDOTE ABOUT CLASSMATES TRYING TO FORCE WILEDEN TO SMOKE TOBACCO
Scope and Content Note: Strict Methodist background forbade Wileden from smoking tobacco, although classmates tried to force him.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   18:45
ANECDOTE HOW RAUCOUS NOON RECESSES LED WILEDEN INTO BOXING
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   20:45
INFLUENCE OF WILEDEN'S PARENTS ON HIS EDUCATION
Scope and Content Note: Never any question that the Wileden children would be educated.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   21:25
NEIGHBORS SCOFF AT WILEDEN FAMILY'S FAITH IN EDUCATION
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   23:25
WILEDEN'S FIRST TEACHING POSITION
Scope and Content Note: After graduating from Menomonee Falls High School, County Superintendent of Schools, George B. Rhoads, offered Wileden a teaching position at Ottawa School District #1, south of Dousman.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   24:35
WILEDEN'S TEACHER CERTIFICATION
Scope and Content Note: Attended Milwaukee Normal College in the summer of 1914 for six weeks training; wrote a diploma examination to receive teacher certificate.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   25:15
FIRST TEACHING ASSIGNMENT: OTTAWA #1 (WAUKESHA COUNTY)
Scope and Content Note: At age eighteen began teaching grades one through nine at Ottawa ##1. Area residents of heavy English and Welsh ancestry. Age groups usually combined into five grade levels.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   27:50
OBSERVATIONS ON ENGLISH AND WELSH COMMUNITY AROUND OTTAWA #1
Scope and Content Note: “A rather homogenous group,” centered around the Presbyterian church and Ottawa #1. New families quickly assimilated. English and Welsh families valued education more than Germans.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   29:20
WILEDEN'S TEACHING METHODS
Scope and Content Note: “A very unconventional teacher.” Wileden basically applied Brock's teaching methods.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/1
Time   30:05
RECREATION AT OTTAWA #1
Scope and Content Note: Playground about two acres, partially heavily wooded. Wileden played basketball and baseball with students “with no discrimination by age or sex.” Recreation time frequently ran into class time.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   00:25
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   01:25
CONTINUATION OF DISCUSSION OF RECREATION AT OTTAWA #1
Scope and Content Note: On Friday afternoons, Wileden and students often hiked to a farm or to the woods. Projects included a school forest and calf club, supervised by county agent.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   03:30
SCHOOL BOARD'S CONCERN ABOUT WILEDEN'S UNCONVENTIONAL TEACHING
Scope and Content Note: School board met secretly to discuss Wileden's unconventional teaching methods. County superintendent of schools Rhoads advised board to take no action until end of school year. Wileden's salary raised from $45.00 to $65.00 per month after all five senior students passed county diploma examination, two with highest grades in the county.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   05:30
WILEDEN'S VIEWS ON THE PURPOSE OF EDUCATION
Scope and Content Note: “It's not a matter of communicating subject matter; basically education is a matter of motivating young people to want to get subject matter and to know where they go get it when they want it.”
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   06:15
FEW DISCIPLINARY PROBLEMS AMONG STUDENTS
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   07:05
HOUSING ACCOMMODATIONS WHILE TEACHING AT OTTAWA #1
Scope and Content Note: First two years lived with Irvey family two miles from school; later, two years with Probert family.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   07:50
INFLUENCE OF PROBERT FAMILY ON WILEDEN
Scope and Content Note: Ed Probert the same age as Wileden; interested him in basketball and hunting. Probert also encouraged Wileden to take voice lessons and study violin.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   09:10
WILEDEN'S PARTICIPATION IN COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES
Scope and Content Note: Very active. Member of Christian Endeavor Society, Presbyterian Church. Wileden and United Church of Christ minister started Boy Scout troop. On weekends Wileden and friends hunted on Pabst farms.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   10:40
PARTICIPATION IN COMMUNITY AFFAIRS AIDS TEACHING
Scope and Content Note: Participation in community affairs helped things go smoothly in the classroom.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   11:40
WILEDEN'S STUDENTS AT OTTAWA #1
Scope and Content Note: Enrollment never exceeded twenty pupils. In typical class of eighth grade graduates, at least half went to high school, and probably half of those to college. Welsh and English-Americans in district placed high value on education.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   12:35
INFLUENCE OF WAR IN EUROPE ON COMMUNITY LIFE NEAR DOUSMAN
Scope and Content Note: War in Europe seemed unreal because of little communication with the “outside world” until 1916, when Wileden's predecessor at Ottawa #1 left for Camp Sheridan for officer training; later sent overseas and wounded. Brought greater awareness of war.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   15:15
WILEDEN ENLISTS IN ARMY INSTEAD OF RENEWING HIS CONTRACT AT OTTAWA #1
Scope and Content Note: In July 1917, when contract expired, Wileden enlisted in the army, answering President Wilson's call to “make the world safe for democracy.” Applied for cavalry duty but assigned to field artillery.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   17:05
WILEDEN'S ARMY DUTIES
Scope and Content Note: Entered service in July 1917; served until April 1918 as teacher, drill sergeant, and finally signer of discharge certificates.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   17:55
WILEDEN ACCEPTS TEACHING POSITION AT BROOKFIELD
Scope and Content Note: After army discharge Wileden taught school at Brookfield. Asked to return the next term, but decided to attend the University of Wisconsin.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   18:40
WHY WILEDEN DECIDED TO ATTEND UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: Had attended summer session while teaching at Ottawa #1. Originally planned to start law school, but army experiences proved to Wileden that city life wasn't for him. Then decided to teach vocational agriculture.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   20:00
HOW WILEDEN FINANCED HIS EDUCATION
Scope and Content Note: Received $30.00 per month state veterans' bonus, which complemented small savings and job as part-time secretary of Madison YMCA. Began full-time study in 1919; after two years ran out of funds. Accepted principalship of Racine County School of Agriculture after Dean James recommended him for the position.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   22:45
REVIEW OF STAFF AND COURSES AT RACINE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL
Scope and Content Note: Wileden taught general agriculture, algebra, geometry, chemistry, agronomy, and poultry, which amounted to six hours of teaching in an eight hour day.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   23:50
WILEDEN'S LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS AT RACINE COUNTY AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL
Scope and Content Note: Lived in dormitory with students while there for two years.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   24:15
WILEDEN EMPLOYED BY U.W. EXTENSION
Scope and Content Note: Worked particularly with rural organizations establishing County Council of Rural Clubs, the development of which was written up later in Rural America.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   25:00
ANECDOTE ABOUT HELPING WAUKESHA COUNTY AGENT SET UP STATE FAIR EXHIBIT
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   26:10
WILEDEN MEETS FUTURE WIFE
Scope and Content Note: Net at state fair. The future Mrs. Wileden (Harriet Acklam) lived on farm on Green Bay Road, outside Racine.
 
 
Tape/Side   1/2
Time   27:30
CONTINUATION OF EDUCATION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON
Scope and Content Note: Rejected offer to remain on staff of Racine County agricultural school; completed his undergraduate education at U.W.-Madison in 1924. Active in campus activities, but a “barb” (he did not join a fraternity).
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   00:40
ASSISTANTSHIP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON
Scope and Content Note: After completing undergraduate education, accepted $500 assistantship in rural sociology. Taught old Kolb-Galpin course in Rural Life. Wrote bulletin entitled Rural Community Organization Handbook.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   02:35
MASTERS DEGREE IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY
Scope and Content Note: In 1925 received Masters Degree in Rural Sociology under B. H. Hibbard.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   03:00
WILEDEN CONTINUES EDUCATION AT U.W.
Scope and Content Note: Declined offer of staff position in applied sociology at Ohio State University. Decided to continue graduate studies at U.W. on part-time basis; accepted appointment supported by Purnell research funds.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   04:40
SOME “MORALISTIC” RURAL SOCIOLOGISTS RESENT TERM “SPECIAL INTEREST” GROUPS
Scope and Content Note: While doing research at the U.W. on rural organizations, Wileden used the term “special interest” groups, first used by Dr. Robert E. Park of the University of Chicago. Many “moralistic” rural sociologists objected to the term; believed it contradicted the concept of cooperation among rural organizations.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   08:50
WILEDENS MARRY, 1926
Scope and Content Note: Wiledens married in 1926 and honeymooned in New York, where Wileden attended summer session at Columbia University.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   09:35
U.W. COLLEAGUES WHO PARTICULARLY IMPRESSED WILEDEN
Scope and Content Note: While teaching at U.W. part-time much impressed by E. A. Ross, John Gillen in sociology; John Commons and Bill Kieckover in economics.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   10:35
GRADUATE STUDY AT CORNELL AS SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL FELLOW
Scope and Content Note: In 1928, with help from Kolb, received Social Science Research Council fellowship for graduate study at Cornell University.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   11:20
EVALUATION OF DWIGHT SANDERSON, PROFESSOR OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY, CORNELL UNIVERSITY
Scope and Content Note: Sanderson had studied the physical sciences, later switched to sociology. “A very remarkable person, but not a very strong teacher.”
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   13:00
DESCRIPTION OF WILEDENS' HOUSING AT CORNELL
Scope and Content Note: Lived in poorly furnished apartment for $40 per month.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   13:45
DECLINES OFFER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT TO RETURN TO WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: “I guess our roots were pretty deep in Wisconsin.” Declined faculty position at University of Connecticut in 1929.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   15:10
WILEDEN ATTENDS THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
Scope and Content Note: Attended the University of Chicago during summer of 1929; studied with A. W. Small and Robert Park.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   15:40
ANECDOTE ABOUT BEDBUG INFESTED DORMITORY AT UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   16:35
BEGINS TEACHING AT UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN IN FALL 1929
Scope and Content Note: In September 1929 began as assistant professor at U.W. to establish rural sociology program in extension. Succeeded David Lindstrom, who in one year at U.W. had started extension program in dramatics.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   17:35
ORGANIZATION OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY PROGRAM IN EXTENSION
Scope and Content Note: Kolb wanted program built on “four wheels and a steering wheel;” steering wheel the organization emphasis, four wheels were drama, music, recreation and discussion.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   18:20
AMBIGUOUS ROLE OF APPLIED RURAL SOCIOLOGY IN LATE 1920s
Scope and Content Note: Rural sociology not sure of its role in the applied field. [Explained in detail in Wileden's Community Development: The Dynamics of Planned Change.]
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   18:50
COMMENTS ON J. H. KOLB, PROFESSOR OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY
Scope and Content Note: “Very dramatic” individual; speeches filled with emotion and drama.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   19:30
U.W. FACULTY MEMBERS WHO HELPED DEVELOP EXTENSION PROGRAM IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   21:20
LEADERSHIP TRAINING EMPHASIZED IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY EXTENSION
Scope and Content Note: Leader training conferences held on county basis for group leaders in the various fields. Other programs held during the Farm and Home Week in Madison; little theater and recreation center operated at state fair park in West Allis.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   23:10
PUBLICATIONS RESULTING FROM WILEDEN'S EXTENSION WORK
Scope and Content Note: Making Rural Organizations Effective resulted from Wileden's work with special interest groups. Because many groups had difficulty in holding a business meeting, he wrote a bulletin on Conducting the Business Meeting. With Gladys Borchers and Ethel Rockwell, wrote Dramatics for Amateur Groups and with H. L. Ewbank, How to Conduct a Group Discussion.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   25:00
WORK WITH UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IN WASHINGTON
Scope and Content Note: In spring of 1935 Wileden served on staff of U.S. Department of Agriculture, exploring and discussing various issues pertaining to agriculture. Traveled throughout Indiana, where people very critical of national government policy.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   26:25
ANECDOTE ABOUT CONSERVATIVE COLLEGE DEAN AT PURDUE UNIVERSITY
Scope and Content Note: Conservative dean resented USDA policies and Wisconsin's liberal reputation; his son, however, an avid admirer of La Follette.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   29:05
COMMENTS ON THE STATE OF IOWA
Scope and Content Note: Although most of Iowa very conservative, four or five counties in the Southwest comprised “Henry Wallace county.”
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   29:50
WILEDEN ASSUMES NEW DUTIES AT WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: Rejected position with USDA staff in 1935; returned to Wisconsin. Full-time extension appointment until 1938, when appointment split between extension and teaching. Also advised students interested in rural social or community organization, which led to course in community organization.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/1
Time   32:00
OBSERVATION ABOUT BUDGETS IN ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS
Scope and Content Note: “Rather than budgets following staff member's activities, budgets follow the available funds.”
 
 
 
2/12/75
 
Tape/Side   2/2
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side   2/2
Time   00:55
CONTINUATION OF CHRONOLOGY
Scope and Content Note: Full time research appointment on Purnell grant, 1926-28; Social Science Research Council fellowship for a year's study at Cornell, 1928-1929; University of Wisconsin assistant professor until 1938, then appointment split between teaching faculty and extension.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/2
Time   02:50
DEVELOPS COURSE IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
Scope and Content Note: In response to student requests, Wileden developed applied sociology course, Community Organization (later renamed Community Development). Large number of students from urban or foreign backgrounds. Course enabled students to observe various rural communities at first-hand.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/2
Time   05:40
WILEDEN DECLINES OPPORTUNITY FOR APPOINTMENT IN ATHENS, GREECE
Scope and Content Note: “The complications of the period” such as an FBI investigation resulted in delay which prevented Wileden from getting Fulbright grant in Greece.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/2
Time   07:20
RURAL CIVILIAN DEFENSE DIRECTOR IN WISCONSIN DURING WORLD WAR II
Scope and Content Note: “A very frustrating experience.”
 
 
Tape/Side   2/2
Time   08:25
DEVELOPMENT OF ORGANIZATION LEADERS' CONFERENCES AND WORKSHOPS
Scope and Content Note: Begun as Rural Organization Leaders Conferences in 1930's to bring rural organizations together to discuss informally common problems. After World War II became Annual Workshop for Professional Community Leaders, which also included representatives of public agencies. “”One of the most significant things that I was involved in.”
 
 
Tape/Side   2/2
Time   12:45
WILEDEN'S APPOINTMENT SPLIT THREE WAYS IN 1962
Scope and Content Note: As one of few remaining senior staff members, Wileden's appointment split three ways in 1962 into teaching, extension, and research. “A practical impossibility” to be completely dedicated to each function.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/2
Time   15:00
TOWN AND COUNTRY CHURCH LEADERS CONFERENCES
Scope and Content Note: “One of the most significant things in which I was involved in over the years.” Wisconsin the first state to hold annual church leaders conferences; Wileden involved almost from the start, first as student caretaker for the campgrounds, then as a teacher, and finally as director of the program.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/2
Time   17:10
RETIREMENT FROM UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN FACULTY, DECEMBER 31, 1966
 
Tape/Side   2/2
Time   17:40
WILEDEN CONTINUES ACTIVITY TN RURAL SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT AFTER RETIREMENT
Scope and Content Note: After retirement kept an office in his former department.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/2
Time   18:40
LOCATION OF WILEDEN'S OFFICES OVER THE YEARS
Scope and Content Note: As an “orphan” (extension professor) of the rural sociology department, Wileden had offices in many different locations.
 
 
Tape/Side   2/2
Time   22:25
RECOLLECTIONS OF CHILDHOOD FARMS, circa 1907-1916
Scope and Content Note: Wileden's father wanted to climb “agricultural ladder”; left family farm in 1903 to become hired manager on 160-acre Brown farm, “probably one of the best farms in the whole area.” Moved to Connell farm to be hired manager from 1905-1907, then returned to Brown farm. Operated Brown farm on share-rent basis; corn a major crop, at first flint corn, later dent corn. Other crops included wheat, oats, barley and potatoes. Increasingly planted only seed certified for use by college of agriculture. Essentially a dairy farm with 12-15 milking cows in a mixed herd. One of Wileden's chores as a boy was to pump cold water around the eight gallon milk cans to keep them cool until picked up by neighbor who operated milk route.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   00:55
ANECDOTE ABOUT SELLING HOGS IN MILWAUKEE
Scope and Content Note: Wileden's father very proud of his Poland China hogs. “Real high event” of year was loading hogs in spring and hauling them sixteen miles to Cudahy packing company at Milwaukee. After dinner at Plankinton house Wiledens bought supplies in Steinmeyer's wholesale grocery.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   03:05
ANECDOTE ABOUT PAY CLERK OVERPAYING WILEDEN'S FATHER
Scope and Content Note: Pay clerk more interested in watching hogs than his work once overpayed Wileden's father by $40.00. Money returned to Cudahy packing company, which sent a large ham in appreciation.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   04:35
TRANSPORTATION
Scope and Content Note: Traveled to Milwaukee by team on the Lisbon Plank Road which, although bumpy, was better than other roads.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   05:45
MORE ON BROWN FARM
Scope and Content Note: All kinds of chickens cared for by Wileden's mother. Large vegetable and flower garden, as well as apple trees.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   07:35
ANECDOTE ABOUT NEIGHBORS HELPING FAMILY WHEN WILEDEN'S FATHER INJURED
Scope and Content Note: Team frightened by an automobile threw Wileden's father from wagon. While incapacitated, neighbors took turns helping with farm work.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   09:00
ANNUAL THRESHING
Scope and Content Note: Custom thresher with steam engine and threshing machine. Neighbors worked together; women fed threshers. Host farmer built his own straw stack--the most disagreeable job.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   11:55
ANECDOTE ABOUT NEIGHBOR WHO OWNED ONE OF FIRST FORD AUTOMOBILES
Scope and Content Note: Difficult to drive up sandy hill and usually took two or three attempts; once drove through end of garage yelling “Whoa.”
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   13:25
MOTOR POWER ON BROWN FARM
Scope and Content Note: Wileden's father never owned or drove a car. No motor power on Brown farm.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   14:25
DESCRIPTION OF MAKING MAPLE SYRUP ON THE BROWN FARM
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   15:30
ANECDOTE ABOUT FIRST HOME COMFORT RANGE
Scope and Content Note: Farm house modernized and home comfort range replaced large fireplace.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   17:00
HEAT AND ILLUMINATION
Scope and Content Note: Home comfort range and wood burning stove for heat; kerosene lamps for lighting.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   19:00
FIRST HUNTING EXPERIENCES
Scope and Content Note: First used a 22-caliber Stevens rifle at about age 12. Later used a sixteen gauge, pinfire, double-barreled shotgun and twelve gauge rolling block, single-barreled shotgun. Ammunition difficult to obtain.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   21:45
SEX ROLES IN DOING THE FARM CHORES
Scope and Content Note: Such chores as pumping and carrying water and filling woodbox started “as soon as you could walk,” Enjoyed gardening which was considered women's and children's work. Boys later responsible for milking four cows every morning and evening; sister expected to help in the house, cooking and gardening.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   24:30
MACHINERY ON BROWN FARM
Scope and Content Note: None except thresher and stationary gasoline engine for sawing wood, both of which were borrowed. All field work done by horse power.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   25:25
CONTINUATION OF DISCUSSION OF CHORES
Scope and Content Note: Summer work included pulling mustard and splitting thistles. Children not permitted to go fishing until all chores completed. Plow on which farmer could ride, rather than follow, “a great advance.”
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   27:40
FARMERS DO ROAD WORK TO PAY TAXES
Scope and Content Note: Taxes partially paid by road work, supervised by a pathmaster.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   29:00
PLOW USED FOR CLEARING PATHS IN WINTER
Scope and Content Note: When snow was very deep, plow tied to side of sled to clear paths in the road.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/1
Time   30:20
RURAL SOCIAL ACTIVITIES
Scope and Content Note: Social life centered around church. People of different religious affiliations attended each other's social activities. Fourth of July always a big occasion, as was the annual church picnic, when people went to the lake, School-related social affairs, such as spelling bees and arithmetic matches, also very important.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/2
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side   3/2
Time   00:50
DESCRIPTION OF ARITHMETIC BEES
Scope and Content Note: Arithmetic bees “a rather violent occasion.”
 
 
Tape/Side   3/2
Time   03:40
FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION
Scope and Content Note: Usually a picnic at Spring Grounds near Sussex. Neighborhood musicians provided band music. Lavish amount of food. Feature of the celebration was a baseball game in which both young and old men participated. Game couldn't start until speakers finished. Will Edwards, a Sussex state assemblyman, a perennial speaker.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/2
Time   10:25
ORGANIZATIONS WHICH WILEDEN'S PARENTS BELONGED TO
Scope and Content Note: Church members only. Few organizations or clubs in the area.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/2
Time   12:15
MARKETING PRODUCE
Scope and Content Note: Wiledens marketed own produce from highly self-sufficient farm. Potatoes purchased by traveling potato buyer; barley hauled to mill and probably went to Schlitz or Pabst brewing companies eventually; wheat taken to mill in Menomonee Falls and ground for flour.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/2
Time   15:35
CLOTHING
Scope and Content Note: Nearly all clothing purchased through Montgomery-Ward or Sears and Roebuck mail order houses. While attending high school at Menomonee Falls, Wileden got first store-bought suit.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/2
Time   18:00
NO TELEPHONE AT BROWN FARM
 
Tape/Side   3/2
Time   18:55
MEDICAL CARE INFLUENCED BY HOMEOPATH AND CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Scope and Content Note: Wileden's mother a homeopathic who used a hermetical book as guide for treatment. On very rare occasions, the family used Dr. Coates, a homeopathic physician in Menomonee Falls. Wileden family health care also influenced by paternal grandmother, a Christian Scientist.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/2
Time   24:45
REMEMBRANCES OF CLIMATE
Scope and Content Note: Terrific snowstorms, more extreme temperatures, and violent rain storms.
 
 
Tape/Side   3/2
Time   28:20
ANECDOTE ABOUT MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER TELLING SCARY STORIES
 
Tape/Side   3/2
Time   30:05
READING MATERIAL
Scope and Content Note: Always the Bible and family record book. Wiledens always subscribed to the Youth Companion. Arthur Wileden often received gift books, mostly classics.
 
 
Tape/Side   4/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side   4/1
Time   00:50
BARBERSHOP AN IMPORTANT MEETING PLACE AND SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR MEN
Scope and Content Note: Barbershop the “greatest source of information in our family.” On Saturday nights men frequently waited hours for their turn, discussed current events and farming with others.
 
 
Tape/Side   4/1
Time   02:25
FLINT CORN VERSUS DENT CORN
Scope and Content Note: Flint corn allegedly so hard it would break pig's teeth. Dent corn of better quality, and greater yield.
 
 
Tape/Side   4/1
Time   05:00
WILEDENS ORDER GARDEN SEEDS FROM BURPEES
 
Tape/Side   4/1
Time   05:20
FARMERS EXCEL IN DIFFERENT SPECIALTIES
Scope and Content Note: Rather than one “showplace” farm, each farmer excelled in a particular area, such as pure-bred cattle.
 
 
Tape/Side   4/1
Time   07:40
FARMERS INSTITUTES IMPORTANT SOCIAL AS WELL AS EDUCATIONAL FUNCTION
Scope and Content Note: Farmers Institutes had as speakers such farmers as George McKerrow, who had done unusually well in a certain type of farming.
 
 
Tape/Side   4/1
Time   09:35
WILEDEN FARM BECOMES DEMONSTRATION POULTRY FARM
Scope and Content Note: Wileden at University of Wisconsin learned of various improvements which his parents adopted, such as a brooder house. Although neighbors scoffed at the “college kid's” ideas, soon other area farms had brooder houses. In this sense Wileden farm served as demonstration farm.
 
 
Tape/Side   4/1
Time   12:15
COMMENTS ON DEMONSTRATION FARMS
Scope and Content Note: In early days, farmers excelled in different areas and no farm served as a single, model demonstration farm. More general demonstration farm with “everything in one place” not popular until after World War I, then became rather important as research and experimental center, although far removed from reality of a typical farm.
 
 
 
2/27/75
 
Tape/Side   5/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side   5/1
Time   01:30
WILEDEN'S READING MATERIAL
Scope and Content Note: Home library had complete works of Shakespeare, Cooper, Longfellow, and Whittier. Such paperbacks as the Buffalo Bill series and The Boys of '76 were “forbidden literature,” but circulated secretly among boys. Fascinated by Zane Grey series. Holdings probably unusual for a farm household. An avid reader in his youth, characters from these novels in later years often used by Wileden to illustrate a point or ease tension in a group discussion.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/1
Time   09:50
DESCRIPTION OF WILEDEN HOMESTEAD FARM circa 1900
Scope and Content Note: Small farm in Waukesha County, located near “Sixteen school” and a small United Presbyterian Church. Raised corn, wheat, barley, and oats, Orchards of apples, sour cherries, damson plums, and bushes of gooseberries and all kinds of currants. Large garden, bee colonies, and all types of chickens. No power machinery. Utensils for making soap from water and lye. Seed probably shared among farmers.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/1
Time   17:45
DESCRIPTION OF BROWN FARM
 
Tape/Side   5/1
Time   18:00
DESCRIPTION OF CONNELL FARM
Scope and Content Note: Located north of Menomonee Falls, about 300 acres but very stony soil. Wileden's father managed the farm for $25.00 per month and large shares of produce and meat. Neighborhood heavily German; Wileden's parents never felt they “fit in.”
 
 
Tape/Side   5/1
Time   20:55
ANECDOTE ABOUT NEIGHBORING GERMAN FAMILY MAKING SAUERKRAUT
Scope and Content Note: Thrifty German family made sauerkraut with bare feet.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/1
Time   22:40
CONTINUATION OF DISCUSSION OF CONNELL FARM
Scope and Content Note: Very productive crop of gophers. Children skated on fields frozen over from flooded Menomonee river.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/1
Time   23:40
DESCRIPTION OF LAST WILEDEN FARM circa 1916
Scope and Content Note: South of Sussex next to Walter Hardiman's farm. Known locally as Grant farm. Small farm with some fertile bottomlands, but many limestone outcroppings. About 1918 or 1919, Wileden's father purchased a Case tractor in Sussex.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/1
Time   27:25
WILEDEN'S FATHER
Scope and Content Note: Hard working person, a very good farmer, but not a good farm manager. Disappointed that neither son interested in farming.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/1
Time   28:10
HOW POULTRY IMPROVEMENT INTRODUCED AND ADOPTED
Scope and Content Note: Arthur Wileden made some suggestions for poultry improvements, learned at the University of Wisconsin. Adopted by parents; later by neighbors. Description of Wileden poultry operation.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/2
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side   5/2
Time   01:30
DISCUSSION OF FARM INNOVATION PRACTICES IN AREA
 
Tape/Side   5/2
Time   05:00
INCREASING POULTRY SPECIALIZATION ON WILEDEN FARM
Scope and Content Note: Wileden's father concentrated more and more on poultry business; in 1939 sold the farm and moved to Sussex.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/2
Time   05:45
WILEDEN'S PARENTS EAGER TO TRY FARM INNOVATIONS
Scope and Content Note: Wileden's parents proud of college-educated son; welcomed his ideas.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/2
Time   07:45
MCKERROWS OUTSTANDING INNOVATORS IN SHEEP FARMING
Scope and Content Note: McKerrows internationally known for raising sheep, imported from England. While vacationing in Wyoming recently, Wileden met a sheep farmer who had traveled to England with McKerrow to buy sheep.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/2
Time   10:40
INFLUENCE OF MCKERROWS IN GOLDEN GUERNSEY COOPERATIVE
Scope and Content Note: McKerrows very active in Wisconsin Guernsey Breeders Association and Gavin McKerrow long-time president Golden Guernsey Cooperative. Wileden recalls Golden Guernsey retail outlet, the Milk Jug.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/2
Time   11:55
COMMENTS ON DISILLUSIONING MILITARY EXPERIENCE
Scope and Content Note: “My military experience was my great disillusionment as to what life was all about, and how low humanity could become in terms of human behavior.” An idealist, Wileden responded to President Wilson's call to “make the world safe for democracy” and was accepted into field artillery. At first, taught recruits to write, later was a drill sergeant, and also a battalion boxing champion, finally signed discharge papers. “Shocked” by hundreds of soldiers in the “pen” awaiting medical treatment.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/2
Time   18:40
HOW MILITARY REDIRECTED WILEDEN'S LIFE
Scope and Content Note: Army contact with people from urban areas, “the dredge of humanity,” led him to appreciate his rural background, and decided on lifelong association with agriculture instead of law.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/2
Time   20:50
WILEDEN'S RESPONSE TO “MAKING THE WORLD SAFE FOR DEMOCRACY”
Scope and Content Note: “A nice catch phrase.” Slogans motivate people, and Wileden caught in it. Felt Wilson knew what he was doing.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/2
Time   21:55
POSTWAR DISILLUSIONMENT
Scope and Content Note: Regretted he wasn't overseas; disillusioned with military experiences so contrary to his upbringing.
 
 
Tape/Side   5/2
Time   24:00
OBSERVATION ON HOW ONE MAKES DECISIONS
Scope and Content Note: “I think life is a matter of repeated forks in the road and repeated decisions that we make, until you reach the later years when the road is straighter but not so well paved, but there are not so many forks when you have to make the decision.”
 
 
Tape/Side   5/2
Time   25:30
WILEDEN'S COURSE OF STUDY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: More interested in life sciences and social sciences than physical sciences which he was “compelled” to take. Wileden's first formal course taught by Kolb who used Galpin's text.
 
 
 
3/5/75
 
Tape/Side   6/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side   6/1
Time   01:50
PEOPLE WHO MOST INFLUENCED WILEDEN
Scope and Content Note: His mother; teachers Henry G. Brock and William circa Hanson; University of Wisconsin professors J. H. Kolb, E. A. Ross, (“a towering person, both physically and emotionally”), and John Gillen. Also Dwight Sanderson, Cornell University, and Madison Bentley, University of Michigan.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/1
Time   13:45
COMMENT ON STRUCTURAL SOCIOLOGY
Scope and Content Note: Madison Bentley, an originator of structural sociology, maintained that when a “free seating” arrangement was available, people sat according to where they felt they fit into the group structure.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/1
Time   17:15
INFLUENCE OF HARRIET WILEDEN ON HER HUSBAND
Scope and Content Note: Harriet Wileden helped to maintain “a quiet and peaceful atmosphere within the family circle” as Wileden was involved in diverse duties.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/1
Time   19:30
EXPERIENCES WITH COMMUNITY GROUPS INFLUENCE DECISION TO BECOME A RURAL SOCIOLOGIST
Scope and Content Note: Through experiences with strong community groups near Dousman and with community clubs near Racine, Wileden gravitated towards rural sociology.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/1
Time   23:40
DISAGREEMENT OVER TERM “SOCIOLOGY”
Scope and Content Note: First sociologists “misfits” from other disciplines and much disagreement over what comprised the discipline. Wileden never considered the term rural sociology to be “sacred.”
 
 
Tape/Side   6/1
Time   27:00
INFLUENCE OF BENJAMIN HIBBARD ON WILEDEN
Scope and Content Note: Hibbard thought of farms as strictly economic organizations, whereas Wileden thought of them as social as well as economic organizations.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/1
Time   29:25
ANECDOTE ABOUT HIBBARD AS WILEDEN'S ADVISOR
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   01:25
FOUNDING OF THE DEPARTMENT OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON
Scope and Content Note: J. H. Kolb frustrated by indifference to the rural sociology section of the Agricultural Economics department; led to the founding of independent Rural Sociology department in 1930-31.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   05:00
COMMENTS ON J. H. KOLB
Scope and Content Note: Ambitious; very dramatic and effective speaker.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   06:00
GRADUATE STUDENTS IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON
Scope and Content Note: Graduate students in rural sociology throughout the United States studied either with Kolb at U.W., or Sanderson at Cornell.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   07:05
CONTINUATION OF COMMENTS ON J. H. KOLB
Scope and Content Note: “Kolb was a strange mixture between minister and scientist; and you never knew which he was at any one moment.' Research studies became classics; were as objective as possible at the time.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   09:20
APPLIED SOCIOLOGY
Scope and Content Note: In 1929, David Lindstrom at University of Wisconsin-Madison, held drama contests as part of the rural sociology program. After Wileden returned to U.W. in 1929, he continued Lindstrom's work with help from Gladys Borchers of the Speech Department and Ethel Rockwell of extension.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   11:00
COLONIZATION OF NORTHERN WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: Recalls statewide controversy over colonization but doesn't think sociologists involved in studies of settlers.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   13:40
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LAND GRANT COLLEGES, PRODUCTION AND MARKETING
Scope and Content Note: Land grant colleges founded to acquire knowledge about farming which would increase production, to guarantee an adequate food supply for the United States. It followed that land grant colleges would be concerned with colonization. However, early land grant colleges not concerned with marketing or distributing the product, or living conditions of farmers. Emphasis changed with report of American Country Life commission during Theodore Roosevelt's administration,
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   17:45
HENRY C. TAYLOR AND FOUNDING OF DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: About 1909-10 Henry Taylor of U.W. Department of Economics arranged to teach economics in the School of Agriculture. Man of great foresight; responsible for bringing Galpin to the U.W.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   19:05
COMPARISON OF TAYLOR AND HIBBARD
Scope and Content Note: Taylor “was basically a farm management man,” and had a broad orientation towards economics; Hibbard more interested in philosophy of agricultural economics.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   20:00
POLICY DECISION-MAKING
Scope and Content Note: Informal meetings held in corridors, faculty offices, or over the luncheon table often led to policy decisions; policy-making later formalized in departmental meetings.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   23:40
COMMENTS ON DEAN CHRIS L. CHRISTIANSEN
Scope and Content Note: Increasing criticism against Russell, especially for involvement in northern Wisconsin colonization program, led to replacement by Chris Christiansen, “a very different sort of person” who had worked with Danish folk schools and cooperatives in Denmark. Changed emphasis of the College of Agriculture from production orientation to more general approach, despite criticism. Particularly concerned with keeping in touch with people at the “grass roots level.”
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   27:00
ANECDOTE ABOUT CHRISTIANSEN ATTENDING A FARMERS UNION MEETING IN CLARK COUNTY
Scope and Content Note: Christiansen, learning of Wileden's work with Wisconsin farmers' organizations went along to Farmers Union meeting in Clark County; spent several hours talking with small groups after the meeting.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   28:35
FARMERS UNION CRITICISM OF CHRISTIANSEN
Scope and Content Note: Farmers Union in years past critical of Russell, unfairly criticized Christiansen. Failed to realize Christiansen's responsibility for shifting emphasis. “One of the best administrators I ever worked under” during very difficult transition period. Farmers Union criticism continued because of political implications of such leaders as Kenneth Hones changing position.
 
 
Tape/Side   6/2
Time   31:25
TRANSITION IN COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE FROM PRODUCTION ORIENTATION TO MORE GENERAL APPROACH
Scope and Content Note: Although Hibbard had begun the transition, little direction in the applied field of extension. Theodore Macklin, very personable, most responsible for the transition in the applied field.
 
 
Tape/Side   7/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side   7/1
Time   01:20
COMMENTS ON THEODORE MACKLIN
Scope and Content Note: Macklin, Henry Bakken, and Marvin Schaars under Hibbard's leadership worked in product marketing. Whereas Bakken and Schaars researched and taught, Macklin worked in applied aspects of marketing. Macklin a “personable individual, who enjoyed stirring up a fight”; as a consequence faced opposition within and outside the U.W.
 
 
Tape/Side   7/1
Time   04:10
CONTRAST BETWEEN MACKLIN AND AARON SAPIRO
Scope and Content Note: Both dynamic and effective speakers, but with entirely different viewpoints about cooperative marketing.
 
 
Tape/Side   7/1
Time   05:55
FARM AND HOME WEEK
Scope and Content Note: While issues discussed throughout the year at the local level, Farm and Home Week the most important forum. Hibbard the key individual as an effective speaker.
 
 
Tape/Side   7/1
Time   07:00
HIBBARD'S SPEAKING ABILITY
Scope and Content Note: Hibbard spoke with a “subtle sarcasm”; speaking engagements often ended in a “showdown.” Appeared aloof of audience, but an easy individual to know.
 
 
Tape/Side   7/1
Time   09:30
DEAN CHRISTIANSEN AS AN OUTSTANDING ADMINISTRATOR
Scope and Content Note: “Christiansen was the man who turned the tide” in the College of Agriculture. Strengthened farm short course by bringing in John Barton from Denmark to direct it; introduced new marketing and cooperatives courses.
 
 
Tape/Side   7/1
Time   11:10
SOCIOLOGY ASSOCIATED WITH RADICALISM
Scope and Content Note: Many associated the term “sociology” with radicalism. Joseph McCarthy suspected sociologists of being Communists. When Wileden worked in Washington, felt term “sociologist” a detriment.
 
 
Tape/Side   7/1
Time   14:35
WISCONSIN COUNCIL OF AGRICULTURE
Scope and Content Note: Wileden aware of formation of Wisconsin Council of Agriculture in 1928 through his acquaintanceship with Milo Swanton. Theoretically a good idea for farmers organizations to have combined voice at the state level; in practice an “off and on deal.” Some groups could not reconcile their differences to join the Council.
 
 
Tape/Side   7/1
Time   16:55
WISCONSIN COUNCIL OF AGRICULTURE SHIFTS EMPHASIS FROM GENERAL FARMERS ORGANIZATIONS TO COOPERATIVES
Scope and Content Note: Over the years Wisconsin Council of Agriculture became more representative of business cooperatives than farmers organizations. Overall trend for farmers organizations to be less influential than cooperatives in formulating agricultural policy.
 
 
Tape/Side   7/1
Time   18:45
MAKING RURAL ORGANIZATIONS EFFECTIVE
Scope and Content Note: Interest in rural organizations started with Galpin. Void when he left until study on special interest groups and the bulletin, Making Rural Organizations Effective, which became basic text for county-level leadership training. Culminated in Rural Organization Leaders Conferences, where state representatives of Farmers Union, Grange, community clubs and PTAs participated in institutes similar to those held at county level.
 
 
Tape/Side   7/1
Time   24:15
EXTENSION SERVICE TO FARMERS ORGANIZATIONS
Scope and Content Note: Wileden wrote bulletin, Rural Community Organizations Handbook as a compilation of ideas for organizations to use. Wileden met with county agents to interest them in county extension leadership training programs.
 
 
Tape/Side   7/1
Time   27:50
WISCONSIN DECLINES TO SET UP EXTENSION PROGRAM SIMILAR TO IOWA
Scope and Content Note: Much pressure by some Wisconsin county agents for extension to begin monthly program service as in Iowa. Extension in Wisconsin refused to sanction a standardized philosophy and program for the entire state; instead sent quarterly bulletin to farmers organizations with suggestions and sources they might use for assistance. Impossible to work directly with farmers organizations; must work instead through existing extension structure.
 
 
 
3/19/75
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/1
Time   00:10
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/1
Time   01:00
COMMENTS ON EXTENSION DIRECTOR K. L. HATCH
Scope and Content Note: Former director of a county school of agriculture with strong background in technical aspects of agricultural production. Interesting and likable, he gave staff members maximum freedom to develop.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/1
Time   06:15
COMMENTS ON WARREN W. CLARK, SUCCESSOR TO HATCH AS EXTENSION DIRECTOR
Scope and Content Note: A successful county agent. J. H. Kolb, Wileden, and Nat Frame, developer of extension recreation and cultural arts programs in West Virginia, persuaded Hatch to include these programs in Wisconsin. Violent disagreements between Clark and Kolb over extension recreational and cultural arts programs. Politically conservative, Clark opposed the consumer cooperative approach.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/1
Time   16:30
COMMENTS ON J. H. KOLB
Scope and Content Note: Kolb “a difficult person to understand,” who originally supported expansion of extension recreational and cultural arts programs, but later withdrew support.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/1
Time   19:15
MORE ON DEAN CHRISTIANSEN, KOLB AND CLARK
Scope and Content Note: Christiansen supported cultural arts program; caught in crossfire between Kolb and Clark. Clark built some administrative structure and strengthened county agent system.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/1
Time   22:10
ANECDOTE ABOUT CLARK FORBIDDING DISCUSSION OF CONSUMER COOPERATIVES
Scope and Content Note: Wileden arranged county-wide workshops to discuss controversial issues; one arranged in Ashland to discuss consumer and producer cooperatives. Ashland editor John Chapple considered consumer cooperatives “akin to communism”; notified Clark, who directed district supervisor Walter Rowlands to order Wileden to cancel the workshop.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/1
Time   26:25
MORE COMMENTS ON WARREN CLARK
Scope and Content Note: Controversy between Clark and Kolb remained until Clark's retirement. Wileden and Clark disagreed over annual reports sent to Washington because Wileden insisted on reporting failures as well as successes, whereas Clark wanted only successes reported.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/1
Time   28:40
COMMENTS ON HENRY AHLGREN, CLARK'S SUCCESSOR
Scope and Content Note: “A breath of fresh air” when Ahlgren became director. “Probably one of the two or three best administrators under whom I have ever served.” Background in agronomy and research; an outstanding teacher. Staff members free to discuss anything with Ahlgren.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/2
Time   00:20
CHANGES IN RURAL WISCONSIN IN A CHANGING AGRICULTURAL ECONOMY
Scope and Content Note: Rural population began decline, especially in northern Wisconsin; agriculture grew more technical, “big business-like.” Farms more difficult to finance and the “agricultural ladder” began to disappear. Ten-cow farms replaced by those with 50 or 60 cows.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/2
Time   02:40
MERGER OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SERVICES
Scope and Content Note: Wileden had worked as much with various general extension services as with cooperative extension services before the merger of the two.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/2
Time   04:30
CONTINUATION OF COMMENTS ON AHLGREN
Scope and Content Note: Ahlgren appointed assistant chancellor, then chancellor of the newly merged university extension services. Ahlgren a skillful leader, with an ability to bring together people of opposite viewpoints.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/2
Time   05:40
ANECDOTE ABOUT DISPUTE OVER CHURCH LEADERS CONFERENCES
Scope and Content Note: Support of annual conferences for church leaders an example of courageous decision made by Ahlgren. President Harrington and Lorentz H. Adolfson, Director of General Extension, refused to take stand on the controversial issue.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/2
Time   11:40
ANECDOTE ABOUT INSURING STUDENTS DOING COMMUNITY STUDIES FIELDWORK
Scope and Content Note: Wileden told he must assume all responsibility for any accidents while students were doing community studies fieldwork. No accidents in twenty years.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/2
Time   14:10
AHLGREN SUPPORTS COMMUNITY STUDIES
Scope and Content Note: Very much in favor of community studies, especially studies of French Island, Washington Island, and Rock Island.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/2
Time   15:30
MORE ON AHLGREN
Scope and Content Note: Ahlgren forward-looking, non-authoritative, helpful in getting problems worked out, and very personable.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/2
Time   19:00
WILEDEN'S INITIAL CONTACT WITH FARMERS ORGANIZATIONS
Scope and Content Note: Began with Rural Organization Leaders Conferences, which arose out of study of Special Interest Groups in Rural Society. Later began to work full-time for extension, and felt the University should assist rural organization leaders.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/2
Time   22:10
FORMAT OF LEADER TRAINING CONFERENCES AND WORKSHOPS
Scope and Content Note: Leaders met together as well as in subgroups according to their particular job as officers, leaders in drama, music, social recreation, public affairs and public discussion. From eight to twelve workshops held annually in counties throughout the state.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/2
Time   23:40
FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS WHICH USE EXTENSION SERVICES
Scope and Content Note: Training workshops helped get farmers organizations involved with Extension. Wisconsin Farmers Union, particularly Jean Long, receptive. Also Grange, parent-teacher associations, community clubs, women's clubs and farmers' clubs, heavily involved. Farm Bureau did not respond; wanted services provided only for its leaders. County meetings ultimately led to annual state organization leaders conferences. Extension's dissemination of information to state organizations encouraged free discussion of issues.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/2
Time   27:55
WHY THE FARM BUREAU REJECTED EXTENSION'S SERVICES
Scope and Content Note: Farm Bureau originated as agency of extension, and in other states remained integrated. Different in Wisconsin where K. L. Hatch refused to permit that kind of Farm Bureau-extension relationship.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/2
Time   28:50
WHY THE GRANGE AND FARMERS UNION REACTED FAVORABLY TO EXTENSION SERVICES
Scope and Content Note: Grange always interested in educational program; extension services “like a breath of fresh air” to Wisconsin Farmers Union, surprised that the university interested in their organization.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/3
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/3
Time   00:20
PUBLIC AFFAIRS DISCUSSIONS FOCUS ON CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES
Scope and Content Note: Extension insisted that controversial issues be thoroughly discussed and decisions made by the group. Included such issues as dairy marketing, doctor's fees, and so on. Farm Bureau did not respond to the program, whereas the Farmers Union did.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/3
Time   03:00
ANECDOTE ABOUT MEETING ON DAIRY PRODUCTS MARKETING
Scope and Content Note: Wileden and Ewbank prepared an attitude scale on dairy marketing which was distributed to representatives of various farmers organizations. Results showed that people had listened attentively during a public affairs discussion on dairy marketing and changed their opinions as a result.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/3
Time   05:25
NATIONAL FARMERS ORGANIZATION (NFO)
Scope and Content Note: Growing in state just as Wileden retiring.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/3
Time   05:50
DEAN CHRISTIANSEN SUPPORT FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS DISCUSSIONS
Scope and Content Note: Dean Christiansen strongly supported public affairs discussions; helped bring Martin Anderson to extension staff.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/3
Time   06:20
DEPARTMENT OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY DISCONTINUES PUBLIC AFFAIRS DISCUSSIONS
Scope and Content Note: One summer while Wileden teaching at Cornell, rural sociology department encouraged Martin Anderson to leave; program of public affairs discussions dropped.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/1/3
Time   07:20
BULLETIN ON CONDUCTING THE BUSINESS MEETING DESIGNED TO AID FARMERS
Scope and Content Note: Such bulletins as Conducting the Business Meeting designed to give farmers more confidence in expressing their opinions. Reprinted twelve times since 1928.
 
 
 
3/27/75
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/1
Time   00:55
EVOLUTION OF WILEDEN'S INTEREST IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
Scope and Content Note: Drift of Wileden into community development stemmed from experiences in rural communities where organizational structure centered around family, church and school. His father had also belonged to fraternal organization called the Modern Woodmen.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/1
Time   04:45
INFLUENCE OF LEADERSHIP STRUCTURE AND TRAINING IN ARMY
Scope and Content Note: Wileden observed leadership structure in the army, especially noting qualities of good leaders and leadership potential.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/1
Time   08:50
ORGANIZATIONAL INTERESTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: Very involved in such organizations as the YMCA, debating society, and campus politics, although he was a “mugwump.” Helped organize association for returning veterans, “the Agricultural Triangle.”
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/1
Time   12:10
INVOLVEMENT WITH RURAL ORGANIZATIONS IN RACINE COUNTY
Scope and Content Note: Interested in rural clubs and in 1925 formed countywide Council of Rural Clubs.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/1
Time   14:55
KOLB'S ASSISTANCE TO WILEDEN
Scope and Content Note: J. H. Kolb in 1924 offered Wileden $500 assistantship to join Rural Sociology section, teach, and write bulletin Rural Community Organizations Handbook while working on masters' thesis.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/1
Time   17:10
ADDITIONAL FEDERAL FUNDS PERMIT FURTHER RESEARCH ON RURAL LIFE
Scope and Content Note: Additional federal funds made available to land grant colleges for research in social sciences enabled Wileden to research special interest groups in rural society, and publish bulletin on the subject.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/1
Time   19:00
IMPACT OF DWIGHT SANDERSON ON WILEDEN'S IDEAS ABOUT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
Scope and Content Note: Social Science Research Council fellowship gave Wileden opportunity to study at Cornell under Sanderson, whose interest in communities had a great impact on Wileden's thinking.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/1
Time   20:40
WILEDEN'S INVOLVEMENT WITH RURAL ORGANIZATIONS WHILE IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY EXTENSION
Scope and Content Note: Assigned to develop Rural Sociology extension; led to much involvement with rural Wisconsin organizations.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/1
Time   26:25
HOW PROFESSIONAL COMMUNITY LEADERS WORKSHOPS AID COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
Scope and Content Note: Professional Community Leaders Workshops provided opportunity for organizational representatives to get together and discuss community development. Dean Ahlgren strongly supported workshops.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/1
Time   29:30
WHY COMMUNITY LEADERS WORKSHOPS ESTABLISHED IN 1951
Scope and Content Note: Shift in population from rural to urban areas partly responsible for development of Community Leaders Workshops.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/2
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/2
Time   00:35
WHY PROFESSIONAL COMMUNITY LEADERS WORKSHOPS ESTABLISHED
Scope and Content Note: As the population shifted, rural areas received less attention. Growing concern over social and economic problems of rural areas, such as those involving schools and hospitals.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/2
Time   04:05
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMPETITION
Scope and Content Note: Competition between communities to be center of services, since many without services would not survive.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/2
Time   10:40
COMMENTS ON GREENDALE, A GOVERNMENTAL PLANNED COMMUNITY NEAR MILWAUKEE
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/2
Time   12:00
COMMENTS ON KOHLER VILLAGE, AN INDUSTRIAL PLANNED COMMUNITY
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/2
Time   13:10
CONCERN FOR COMMUNITIES LEADS TO EMPHASIS ON LONG-RANGE PLANNING AND ZONING
Scope and Content Note: Increasing concern for land use led to zoning, later expanded and called planning, then rural development. As political parties change, names of development programs also change but not the content.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/2
Time   15:10
WILEDEN BEGINS GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: Graduate students wanted course in applied rural sociology; source material available too organization oriented and too structural in content, so Wileden compiled materials from own experiences with rural communities in mimeographed publication, “Rural Community Development.” Fellow staff members criticized course title of Community Organization; changed to Rural Community Development.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/2
Time   20:15
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COURSE RESULTS IN COMMUNITY STUDIES
Scope and Content Note: About one-third of students in course from foreign countries and/or urban areas with no exposure to rural communities. Because Madison had many rural communities in immediate vicinity, in-depth community studies conducted.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/2
Time   23:30
COMMENTS ON RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
Scope and Content Note: At recent gathering, Henry Ahlgren expressed to Wileden great satisfaction in emphasis on rural development. Every Wisconsin county today has at least part-time resource agent for rural development.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/2
Time   25:40
PILOT PROGRAM IN RURAL DEVELOPMENT IN PRICE COUNTY
Scope and Content Note: Price County focus of pilot program in rural development because it was particularly disadvantaged.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/2
Time   27:45
MORE ON RECENT DEVELOPMENT IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
Scope and Content Note: Much published on community development since Wileden's retirement.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   8/2/2
Time   28:30
LITTLE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LAND TENURE CENTER AND TRADITION OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
 
 
4/16/75
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/1
Time   01:00
IMPORTANCE OF KNOWING THE HISTORY OF FARMER ORGANIZATIONS IN WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: Necessary to understand the background of the various farmer organizations in Wisconsin in order to understand relationships between organizations and University of Wisconsin.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/1
Time   02:30
BACKGROUND OF NATIONAL GRANGE
Scope and Content Note: Pioneered in producers and consumers cooperatives, most of which failed; today mainly a fraternal organization.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/1
Time   06:35
BACKGROUND OF THE NATIONAL FARMERS UNION
Scope and Content Note: Begun in Wisconsin in 1920's; able to absorb or cooperate with other organizations such as the Farmers Alliance, Non-Partisan League and the Society of Equity. Social and educational organization, with township units, not all of which survived. Unique in being “champion of the small farmer,” which both hindered and helped the organization.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/1
Time   09:40
BACKGROUND OF THE AMERICAN FARM BUREAU FEDERATION
Scope and Content Note: In many states county agents designated also as county Farm Bureau agents; helped Farm Bureau dominate other farmers organizations.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/1
Time   11:40
EXTENSION DIRECTOR IN WISCONSIN REFUSES TO RECOGNIZE FARM BUREAU AS OFFICIAL EXTENSION ORGANIZATION
Scope and Content Note: K. L. Hatch refused to support the county Extension agents in Wisconsin serving as County Farm Bureau agents because he felt Extension Service should be free of alignment with special interest farmers organizations. Wisconsin Farm Bureau in response attempted to persuade some county extension agents to favor the Farm Bureau.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/1
Time   15:15
SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES OF FARMERS UNION AND FARM BUREAU
Scope and Content Note: Many similarities in educational, economic and political programs; both encouraged township level educational organizations, producer cooperatives, and political activity. Farm Bureau, however, tended to support the Republican party, while the Farmers Union supported the Democratic party. Another major difference was that the Farm Bureau tended to support big, commercial farmer; Farmers Union the small farmer.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/1
Time   17:25
BACKGROUND OF COOPERATIVES
Scope and Content Note: Began as offshoots of major farmers organizations, independent of each other, as commodity groups. Today cooperatives as a unit stronger than any single farmers organization.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/1
Time   21:35
CONFLICT BETWEEN FARMERS ORGANIZATIONS IN WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: While Grange became a rural social and fraternal organization, Farmers Union and Farm Bureau competed for territory, Similar educational underpinnings and support of producers cooperatives, but conflict over political alignments, farm legislation, and a basic ideological difference over support of the small farmer and the commercial farm.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/1
Time   26:00
FARM BUREAU CALLS FARMERS UNION A “RADICAL” ORGANIZATION
Scope and Content Note: Farm Bureau called the Farmers Union a “radical” organization, probably because of such leaders as Kenneth Hones.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/2
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/2
Time   00:30
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM
Scope and Content Note: Designed to make rural organizations function more effectively by bringing various organizations together.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/2
Time   03:40
ORGANIZATION OF COUNTY LEADERSHIP TRAINING SCHOOLS
Scope and Content Note: Organized through county extension office on county-wide basis; open to officers and leaders of all rural organizations. Emphasized organizational approach and such programs as drama, music, public discussion, and recreation. Material written for each area of emphasis, including How to Conduct Group Discussion by Wileden and Ewbank; The Wisconsin Folksinger, by Dan Vornholt who collected songs of various Wisconsin ethnic groups. Farm Bureau usually “conspicuous by its absence” from the training conferences.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/2
Time   12:55
COMMENTS ON MILO SWANTON, EXECUTIVE SECRETARY OF THE WISCONSIN COUNCIL OF AGRICULTURE
Scope and Content Note: Swanton tried to involve all farmers organizations in public affairs discussions; must have been very disappointed when Farmers Union and some cooperative groups left the Council of Agriculture and formed another organization, the Wisconsin Association of Cooperatives. Swanton's strong feelings on issues often blocked effective discussion and cooperation.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/2
Time   17:10
EFFECTS OF DEPRESSION ON DRAMA AND RECREATION ACTIVITIES
Scope and Content Note: During Depression, people responded enthusiastically to such programs. National Youth Administration (NYA) students assigned to Wileden and other staff.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/2
Time   19:40
SOME FARMERS GROUPS ORGANIZE OWN LEADERSHIP TRAINING PROGRAMS
Scope and Content Note: Farm Bureau insisted on own training programs and the Farmers Union followed suit. Discouraging to Wileden because it defeated objective of getting organizations together.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/2
Time   20:35
ANNUAL STATEWIDE LEADERSHIP MEETINGS
Scope and Content Note: Format similar to leadership training conferences conducted at county level.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/2
Time   21:20
“SOCIOLOGICAL PURIFICATION” HELPS BRING COLLAPSE OF LEADERSHIP TRAINING PROGRAM IN RURAL SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Scope and Content Note: Program fell apart after World War II. Many new staff members in department objected that leadership training conferences not “sociological.” What Wileden termed the “sociological purification process” resulted in the Kolb-Clark controversy and continued for years. Program staff slowly absorbed into other university departments; public affairs discussion program dropped completely.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/2
Time   26:55
WILEDEN'S RESPONSE TO “SOCIOLOGICAL PURIFICATION PROCESS”
Scope and Content Note: “I suspect we had accomplished our goal, by and large” at the end of twenty-five years. Wileden never committed to sociology as a sociologist per se, but saw it as an opportunity to do what he wanted to do. Forced to redefine role. As a full professor Wileden began resident teaching part-time; ultimately changed course title to community development.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/2
Time   29:10
BEGINNING OF DISCUSSION ON COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT APPROACH
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/3
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/3
Time   00:30
CONTINUATION OF DISCUSSION ON COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT APPROACH
Scope and Content Note: Wileden's special interest became a community approach to society. Community school and hospital systems emerging; felt time was ripe to emphasize community development in sociology at a time when sociologists becoming more specialized.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/1/3
Time   03:30
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
Scope and Content Note: Selected pilot situations to do extensive research and analysis. Wileden became consultant to many groups and organizations both within and outside of Wisconsin. Believed he caught the sense of what was beginning to take place in community development across the country.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/1
Time   00:50
COMMENTS ON KENNETH HONES FORMER PRESIDENT OF WISCONSIN FARMERS UNION
Scope and Content Note: Kenneth Hones focused on issue of farm policy in Washington; approach similar to that of Milo Swanton in his heavy emotional involvement. Bombastic speaker who sometimes smothered opposition within Farmers Union, and thus hurt the organization. Cites Anderson family as example of victims from within Farmers Union. Hones survived for twenty-five years by beating down opposition. Contrasts Hones with successor Gilbert Rohde.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/1
Time   07:55
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN KENNETH HONES AND U.W. COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
Scope and Content Note: Although Hones personally respectful towards Wileden, he used strong rhetoric against College of Agriculture without realizing extent of support from men like Hatch and Clark. Other UW regents neutralized influence of Hones on board during 1930's. Suggests Hones never got over the aggressiveness which is necessary in early days of organization, but becomes detrimental later.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/1
Time   11:10
EXPLAINS HOW DIFFERENT TYPES OF LEADERS NEEDED AT VARIOUS STAGES OF ORGANIZATION
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/1
Time   14:25
PREDICTS FARMERS ORGANIZATIONS WILL COOPERATE
Scope and Content Note: After anecdote about Southern Baptist minister on an airplane, Wileden forecasts farmers organizations will work together more closely in solving mutual problems.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/1
Time   15:15
COMMENTS ON JEAN LONG, LONGTIME EDUCATIONAL DIRECTOR OF WISCONSIN FARMERS UNION
Scope and Content Note: Able, enterprising, and reasonable woman who responded faithfully to U.W. College of Agriculture programs for farmers organizations.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/1
Time   17:50
ASIDE ON LOYALTY TO AN EMPLOYING ORGANIZATION
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/1
Time   20:40
COMMENTS ON WALTER SINGLER, WISCONSIN COOPERATIVE MILK POOL
Scope and Content Note: Remembers him as an advocate of violence; as a speaker he resembled Billy Sunday.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/1
Time   24:05
ANECDOTE ABOUT ATTITUDE SCALE TAKEN AT MEETING ON DAIRY PROBLEMS
Scope and Content Note: Attitude scale taken among organizational spokesmen before and after meeting showed opinion changes.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/1
Time   26:20
COMMENTS ON HERMAN IHDE, MASTER OF WISCONSIN STATE GRANGE
Scope and Content Note: “An entirely different sort of person” from Hones and Singler. Supportive of the College of Agriculture programs. Ihde, like Hones, interested in farm policy in Washington, but Ihde tried to be objective. Physically and otherwise, a “rock of Gibralter.”
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/1
Time   29:35
GRANGE PARTICIPATION IN DRAMA PROGRAM
Scope and Content Note: Recalls many members of Grange who wrote plays as part of College of Agriculture's drama program.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/2
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/2
Time   00:30
WILEDEN CHAGRIN OVER MATERIALS IN FORMER OFFICE
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/2
Time   01:25
GRANGE MASTER NEAL PECK WORKS WITH WILEDEN ON COUNTY COUNCIL OF COMMUNITY CLUBS
Scope and Content Note: Neal Peck, Peshtigo, worked closely with Wileden and Bruce Cartter on pilot project to create a county council of community clubs.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/2
Time   02:45
COMMENTS ON MILO SWANTON, EXECUTIVE SECRETARY OF WISCONSIN COUNCIL OF AGRICULTURE
Scope and Content Note: Milo Swanton became exceptionally effective agricultural spokesman. Council of Agriculture had become a prestigious organization; Swanton an able, experienced leader who “knew where the power was.”
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/2
Time   07:05
COMMENTS ON LOU FRENCH, MILWAUKEE JOURNAL REPORTER
Scope and Content Note: Prided himself on being “a friend of Wisconsin agriculturalists” but was not an objective reporter.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/2
Time   09:05
SPECULATES ON BACKGROUND OF CAMP DOUGLAS INCIDENT AT LEADERSHIP TRAINING CAMP WRITTEN BY MILWAUKEE JOURNAL REPORTER FRENCH
Scope and Content Note: Explanation of sequence of events. Wileden decries journalists in general for blowing minor events out of proportion.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/2
Time   15:25
COMMENT ON FARMERS ORGANIZATIONS COMPETING FOR PUBLIC FUNDS
Scope and Content Note: Farmers groups and other private organizations competed for public funds; of broader consideration is relationship between public employee and private groups.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/2
Time   18:55
COMMENTS ON HONES AND SWANTON RIVALRY
Scope and Content Note: Believes both enjoyed the verbal Combat.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/2
Time   19:30
COMMENT ON PHIL LA FOLLETTE
Scope and Content Note: “Got off base” when began to use Hitler technique, symbolized by U.W. Stock Pavilion meeting in April 1938. Tactics not consistent with progressive tradition of Old Bob.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/2
Time   23:10
COMMENT ON FRANK ZEIDLER, FORMER SOCIALIST MAYOR OF MILWAUKEE
Scope and Content Note: Got to know Zeidler personally while he worked for state Division of Resource Development. Trusted for his honesty and sincerity. A “folksy sort of person” who provided leadership during administration in Milwaukee. Wileden speculates on role of government in providing social services, and projects increasing difficulties for U.S. social security system.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/3
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/3
Time   00:25
FRANK ZEIDLER ASSISTS WILEDEN AND H. CLIFTON HUTCHINS IN ESTABLISHING ROCK ISLAND AS A STATE PARK
Scope and Content Note: In studying Washington Island, Wileden and Hutchins “discovered” Rock Island as great potential state park. Owner agreed; Frank Zeidler persuaded Governor Nelson to support making Rock Island a state park.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   9/2/3
Time   04:20
STATE CONFERENCE FOR COMMUNITY LEADERS AT THE CLEARING
Scope and Content Note: Conference for state-level leaders with theme; invited nationally known speakers. Zeidler one of resource persons; Wileden lauds his principles and character.
 
 
 
4/23/75
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/1
Time   00:30
DIFFICULTY IN UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS/DEPARTMENTS USING PUBLIC AND PRIVATE FUNDS
Scope and Content Note: Policy decisions and freedom of speech can be affected by receiving either public or private funds. Safety depends on relative freedom of pursuit.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/1
Time   03:50
PUBLIC AFFAIRS DISCUSSION PROGRAM PROMOTES FREEDOM OF SPEECH
Scope and Content Note: Public affairs discussion programs began so state groups would have basis to discuss alternative solutions to a problem. Resource materials for public affairs problems included the bulletin How to Conduct Group Discussion, and such subject matter guides as How Can the Buyer Get the Money's Worth?; Is Dairying Doomed in Wisconsin?; Who Should Pay the Doctor Bills?
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/1
Time   11:00
CONTROVERSY OVER WHO SHOULD PAY THE DOCTOR BILLS?
Scope and Content Note: Became controversial because one alternative solution involved organization around consumer cooperatives. Other proposed alternatives included socialized medicine and individual responsibility through personal funds or insurance plans.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/1
Time   12:25
SUPPORT FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS DISCUSSIONS
Scope and Content Note: Statewide support for public affairs discussions.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/1
Time   13:10
OPPOSITION TO PUBLIC AFFAIRS DISCUSSION PROGRAMS
Scope and Content Note: American Medical Association through State Medical Society opposed public affairs discussions on Who Should Pay the Doctor Bills? President Frank and U.W. Regents vindicated Wileden on the issue.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/1
Time   15:30
DEPARTMENT OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY DISCONTINUES PUBLIC AFFAIRS DISCUSSIONS
Scope and Content Note: Public affairs discussions dropped; not considered logical part of sociology. General support outside but not within department.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/1
Time   18:45
REPRIMAND FOR REPORTING FAILURES AS WELL AS SUCCESSES
Scope and Content Note: Required to submit annual reports to federal government, and monthly reports to state. Warned repeatedly that reporting failures as well as accomplishments would jeopardize continuation of funding.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/1
Time   24:45
COMMENTS ON FEDERAL EXTENSION ANNUAL REPORTS
Scope and Content Note: Challenges worthwhileness of information.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/1
Time   29:30
BACKGROUND OF FARM SHORT COURSE
Scope and Content Note: Begun in 1880's by Professor Moore in agronomy, coincidentally with Farmers Institutes to disseminate information to state farmers. Winter short courses held at the College of Agriculture for farm boys and girls.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/2
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/2
Time   00:25
CONTINUATION OF DISCUSSION OF FARM SHORT COURSE
Scope and Content Note: Three five-week terms. In early years, enrollees usually not high school graduates; later most had high school diplomas. Usually took two years to complete course. Many of Wisconsin's best farmers graduates of farm short course, which Wileden taught between years 1926-1940; 1945-1951; 1954-1956.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/2
Time   04:50
DIFFERENCES IN TEACHING SHORT COURSE AND RESIDENT INSTRUCTION
Scope and Content Note: Short Course students “fresh off the farm, full of energy and enthusiasm, and they were anything but a captive audience.” Short course considered “low-level teaching” by some professors; difficult for farm short course directors to recruit good teachers.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/2
Time   07:50
DECLINE IN INTEREST IN FARM SHORT COURSE
Scope and Content Note: Introduction of Smith-Hughes agricultural teaching in high schools led to decline in interest in farm short course. Dean Christiansen attempted to revive course by hiring John Barton, experienced with Danish folk schools, but failed in attempt to apply Danish folk school philosophy to short course.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/1/2
Time   14:00
FARM SHORT COURSE RETURNS TO AGRICULTURAL FORMAT
Scope and Content Note: Smith-Hughes teacher Frank Wilkinson became director; short course became a more concentrated form of what taught in high school. In 1950's the Department of Rural Sociology withdrew completely from farm short course.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/1
Time   00:45
WHY FARM SHORT COURSE TEACHING CONSIDERED “LOW-LEVEL”
Scope and Content Note: Teachers in farm short course among the best in college of agriculture; Wileden believes many critics probably not effective enough individuals to teach a course where students walk out if disinterested.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/1
Time   03:05
WILEDEN'S TECHNIQUE IN TEACHING FARM SHORT COURSE
Scope and Content Note: Found out real concerns of students. Relevant discussions included such topics as marriage, type of farm they wanted to operate, role of child in farm family. Discussion format for classes; instructor presided rather than engage in professorial “speechmaking.”
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/1
Time   06:50
ACADEMIC TEACHING VS. SHORT COURSE INSTRUCTION
Scope and Content Note: Academic instructor has captive audience, students need grade to help get degree; students in farm short course must be stimulated or they walk out.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/1
Time   07:35
WORLD WAR II RURAL CIVILIAN DEFENSE PROGRAM IN WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: Soon after Pearl Harbor, U.S. government set up rural and urban civilian defense programs. Focused on neighborhood leadership system plan. For Wisconsin rural areas, Extension Director Warren Clark asked county extension agents to submit names of two individuals from each “neighborhood” (e.g. one-room school district).
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/1
Time   13:30
JULIUS P. HEIL SETS UP VOLUNTEER WAR SERVICE COMMITTEE
Scope and Content Note: Set up five-member volunteer war service committee for every Wisconsin community. Outdid federal government; issued to volunteers red, white, and blue badges which read, “I am a War Service Committee Member.”
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/1
Time   15:45
“GRAND CONFUSION” IN RURAL CIVILIAN DEFENSE PROGRAM
Scope and Content Note: Dual programs created great confusion; “tons of instructions” issued for such duties as rationing meat, collecting scrap iron, selling government bonds, teaching nutrition. Several months of confusion led Warren Clark to ask Wileden to become state director of Rural Civilian Defense Program. County extension agents disgusted with the confusion over two “unreconcilable systems.” Wileden tried to reconcile regional and state meetings with local volunteers; also devised a guide. Confusion worsened when county agents selected representatives instead of setting up election mechanism; resulted in inexperienced representatives.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/1
Time   24:15
EVALUATION OF RURAL CIVILIAN DEFENSE PROGRAM
Scope and Content Note: “The redeeming factor was that the fighting went so well on the military front that we never needed really to mobilize our volunteer resources.” Milkweed pod collecting among the projects. Wileden remained until war ended; job pre-empted other duties.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/1
Time   29:30
ANECDOTE ABOUT MARTIN ANDERSON TRANSPORTING HAMS TO THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
Scope and Content Note: Commander of liberty ships that took hams to the Philippines.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/2
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/2
Time   00:30
BACKGROUND OF COMMUNITY STUDIES
Scope and Content Note: Community studies provided “classroom laboratory” for urban and foreign students to experience rural life at first hand. Students studied different aspects of a selected, close-by community and “really felt that they were a part of America; the real Midwest America.” [The State Historical Society of Wisconsin has in its collections seventeen of the eighteen community studies; the exception is New Glarus.]
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/2
Time   07:50
SYNCHRONIZED SLIDES AND RECORDINGS
Scope and Content Note: Developed synchronized colored slides and voice recordings [also at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin] to loan to organizations throughout state. Five programs developed; distributed by rural sociology office. Several copied by USDA, AID, and the UN. Bought own equipment and supplies to prepare pilot and demonstrate effectiveness in order to get additional resources. Project discontinued when Wileden retired.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/2
Time   19:15
BACKGROUND OF FRENCH ISLAND PROJECT
Scope and Content Note: Wileden looking for community development pilot project; saw French Island as unique opportunity because it was a rural suburb, near La Crosse.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/2
Time   22:45
DESCRIPTION OF FRENCH ISLAND ABOUT 1951
Scope and Content Note: Very old settlement where many residents had “squatter's rights.” La Crosse residents disinterested; a “red light” district and the city dump. Low land flooded in each spring; packs of dogs and plentiful rats; ramshackle school. La Crosse population growing; French Island needed for expansion.[1]
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/2
Time   30:05
JACK JENNINGS REQUESTS HELP TO IMPROVE FRENCH ISLAND
Scope and Content Note: Jennings retired from Army Corps of Engineers, owned marina, and envisioned better future for French Island. Requested help from University of Wisconsin. French island school principal shared Jennings vision.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   10/2/2
Time   33:15
MAJORITY OF RESIDENTS RESIST CHANGE
Scope and Content Note: Town chairman led French Island residents who opposed any changes.
 
 
 
5/7/75
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/1
Time   00:45
WHY FRENCH ISLAND A UNIQUE EXPERIMENT
Scope and Content Note: Most of La Crosse and French Island residents alike willing to leave situation as it was. Wileden first acquainted with island in 1927; clear that changes would take outside leadership.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/1
Time   05:30
FAILURE OF TRADITIONAL APPROACH
Scope and Content Note: Attempted to establish community organization through which to work for change. Jack Jennings and school principal supportive; most others surprised that any outsider would be interested in French Island. 4-H clubs and churches had failed in the past. After two meetings, community club formed, but eventually “old timers” who resisted change gained control of club. Jennings meanwhile formed the West La Crosse Civic League and worked diligently to get “the right people” in leadership positions.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/1
Time   18:35
SUCCESS OF SPECIAL INTEREST ORGANIZATIONAL APPROACH
Scope and Content Note: Select groups willing to work together on special issues.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/1
Time   19:40
EDUCATION THE KEY TO SPECIAL INTEREST APPROACH
Scope and Content Note: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction ordered annexation of French Island to La Crosse for educational purposes; new school built on island.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/1
Time   20:45
CHURCH APPROACH
Scope and Content Note: La Crosse Council of Churches disinterested; student at Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Dubuque, finally did study of La Crosse church attitudes toward French Island. Lutherans then decided to move in aggressively; hired a “perfect” minister to develop church on French Island.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/1
Time   23:30
YOUTH AND RECREATION APPROACH
Scope and Content Note: City of La Crosse again uncooperative. Larry Langfeld, former Wileden student and La Crosse State Teachers College faculty member, developed recreation program based on student work projects.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/1
Time   25:50
HEALTH PROGRAM
Scope and Content Note: Local residents resisted health program until dog problem got so bad state established a three-month quarantine for rabies. During spring floodings, mass typhoid inoculations given.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/1
Time   27:05
HOUSING PROGRAM
Scope and Content Note: Great potential as residential suburb; in 1953 a county zoning ordinance allowed several contractors to build houses.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/1
Time   28:25
LOCAL GOVERNMENT
Scope and Content Note: Problems because French Island part of town of Campbell, mostly across the channel. West La Crosse Civic League finally influenced elections enough that a businessman was elected as town chairman.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/2
Time   00:45
ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL INTEREST OF TOWN CHAIRMAN IN MAINTAINING STATUS QUO ON FRENCH ISLAND
Scope and Content Note: Operated only farm on French Island; concerned about impact of residential development. Only paved road went from bridge to his farm door.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/2
Time   03:10
WHY LA CROSSE INTEREST GROUPS WISH TO KEEP STATUS QUO
Scope and Content Note: Bewildering to Wileden in a city with good medical clinics, recreational programs, and churches. Some suggested to Wileden that many in La Crosse liked French Island as back-door brothel.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/2
Time   05:25
MORE ON ACTIVITIES OF WEST LA CROSSE CIVIC LEAGUE
Scope and Content Note: Wileden a trusted party to league's meetings and plans.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/2
Time   06:30
MORE ON JACK JENNINGS
Scope and Content Note: Unique individual; rough exterior but genuine concern for people. Created junior marina club.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/2
Time   08:50
SACRIFICE OF SCHOOL PRINCIPAL TO IMPROVE FRENCH ISLAND
Scope and Content Note: Payoff was being fired. Again mentions shoddy physical layout of school on island's south end.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/2
Time   11:25
FRENCH ISLAND AS A LABORATORY
Scope and Content Note: Often brought students to observe over a five-year period.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/2
Time   12:00
WHY U.W. SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN INTERESTED IN FRENCH ISLAND
Scope and Content Note: Little off-campus activity at that time.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/2
Time   13:30
FRENCH ISLAND AS ILLUSTRATION OF INGREDIENTS NEEDED FOR CHANGE
Scope and Content Note: Cooperation from local people first; from official county groups; and from state.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/2
Time   14:30
INTEREST OF PRIVATE BUILDERS IN FRENCH ISLAND
Scope and Content Note: Two small builders took the risk.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/2
Time   16:40
BACKGROUND OF KENOSHA COUNTY CITIZENS SURVEY
Scope and Content Note: Cloistered ideas dormant unless people take action. Wileden involved in Kenosha county in 1929 after J. H. Kolb and D. E. Lindstrom first got underway a citizens self-survey. Set up committee of representative local citizens and professional advisors from different fields. Each survey committee issued report and recommendations; Wileden prepared final report. Idea of cooperative self-survey launched.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/2
Time   24:10
SELF-SURVEY IDEA SPREADS TO DOUGLAS COUNTY
Scope and Content Note: Concern that idle older youth might foment a revolt; situation especially critical in Douglas County. Decided to survey with cooperation of county extension agent Walter Duffy who transferred his approach as a state agricultural commissioner to the county level. Mrs. K. H. Abrahamson, president of county congress of parents and teachers also instrumental in getting project launched. Douglas County Youth Survey Committee established; 15-20 older youth (ages 16-25) selected to participate voluntarily in getting survey schedules filled out. Youth got 800 schedules completed and helped hand-tabulate the data.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/3
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/3
Time   00:05
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS PROMOTE CITIZEN INVOLVEMENT
Scope and Content Note: Allowed citizens to get involved and take pride in themselves and their community.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/1/3
Time   01:25
COUNTY YOUTH CLUBS
Scope and Content Note: Development of county youth club gave young people a sense of importance; allowed chance to meet other young people. Youth Club led to youth surveys, which were undercut by WPA and NYA as paid workers took the place of the young people.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/1
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/1
Time   00:55
COUNTY FORESTRY SCHOOL IN DOUGLAS COUNTY
Scope and Content Note: Forerunner of CCC camps; developed by Walter Duffy in 1930's as outgrowth of Douglas County Youth Survey. Boys lived in abandoned logging camp near Wascott in winter; worked half-days with forester and attended classes half-days under instructor Osborne W. Ralph. Some forestry students went on to UW farm short course; several took bachelors degrees at UW.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/1
Time   06:25
BETTER CITIES SURVEY
Scope and Content Note: Better Cities Survey of Aubrey Williams and Marie Kohler used approach similar to Douglas County survey, included Kenosha county. Prizes awarded for best achievement, an idea which Wileden doesn't agree with.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/1
Time   09:15
A. N. YOUNG, FIRST PRESIDENT OF WISCONSIN FARMERS UNION
Scope and Content Note: Visited his farm many times; active in county leader training conferences. Strongest organizations in Douglas county were Farmers Union and Parent-Teachers organizations.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/1
Time   10:20
ANECDOTE ABOUT STATE CONGRESS OF PARENTS AND TEACHERS FORBIDDING DOUGLAS COUNTY PTA TO PARTICIPATE IN YOUTH SURVEYS
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/1
Time   11:25
MORE COMMENTS ON A. N. YOUNG
Scope and Content Note: Quiet but effective leader; cooperated with University; worked closely with Walter Duffy.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/1
Time   12:20
DUFFY'S IMPORTANCE IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: Duffy as county extension agent ready to act, perhaps in response to criticism that College of Agriculture ignored northern Wisconsin.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/1
Time   14:00
WILEDEN COMMUTES BY AUTO TO NORTHERN WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: Drove 350 miles one way to Superior in old Ford, in all kinds of weather, worked six-day week. Never questioned the routine; “we just did it.”
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/1
Time   17:40
COMMENTS ON EMIL JORGENSON
Scope and Content Note: Former extension agent; ideal experimenter who formed County Council of Rural Clubs and developed county leader training meetings in Waushara county. Effective in getting older youth involved, but didn't always think things through in advance. Warren Clark later hired Jorgenson as state supervisor. Jorgenson also studied with Brunner at Columbia; wrote master's thesis on neighborhood leadership systems.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/1
Time   25:10
COMMENTS ON BRUCE CARTTER
Scope and Content Note: Bruce Cartter, 4-H club leader in Marinette county, developed county federation of rural clubs with Grange leader Neal Peck. Cartter later joined UW rural sociology department to conduct the discussion program and work on masters degree. Later became state director of older youth program in Wisconsin.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/1
Time   27:40
COMMENTS ON VERN HENDRICKSON
Scope and Content Note: Vern Hendrickson former Buffalo county agent; became resource agent for County Rural Resource Development Program in Price County, one of the lowest income counties. Program funded by federal government.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/2
Time   00:00
INTRODUCTION
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/2
Time   00:05
CONTINUATION OF COMMENTS ON VERN HENDRICKSON
Scope and Content Note: Price County experiment “pioneered” the idea of county rural resource development program.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/2
Time   01:00
COMMENT ON HENRY AHLGREN'S PRIDE IN COUNTY RURAL RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/2
Time   02:05
COMMENTS ON REVEREND E. W. MUELLER, LUTHERAN CHURCH OF AMERICA
Scope and Content Note: Mueller a student in Wileden's two-week course at U.W. pastors' school; worked with National Lutheran Council; also active in American Country Life Association and National Church Conference. Outstanding promoter of cooperation and understanding between churches and land grant colleges and universities.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/2
Time   10:40
DENOMINATIONS INVOLVED IN CHURCH CONFERENCES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: Two Lutheran synods, Catholic, Methodist, Presbyterian, United Church of Christ, Baptists, and so on. Sects not involved.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/2
Time   11:45
COMMENTS ON MSGR. LIGUITTI
Scope and Content Note: Strong supporter of Catholic Church participation in UW pastors' conferences, and urged cooperation with other University programs. Vigorous speaker; “one of the real liberals within the Catholic Church.” Opposed church land holdings in South American countries.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/2
Time   14:55
ANECDOTE ABOUT COLOMBIAN PRIEST CRITICAL OF CHURCH OWNERSHIP OF LAND IN SOUTH AMERICA
Scope and Content Note: Colombian priest in community development course wrote term paper for Wileden critical of Catholic church land policy in South America.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/2
Time   16:45
NATIONAL CATHOLIC RURAL LIFE CONFERENCE
Scope and Content Note: Recalls Father Urban Baer and another priest who was very involved.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/2
Time   18:45
ANECDOTE ABOUT TRAVELING WITH CATHOLIC PRIEST
Scope and Content Note: Priest asked Wileden to accompany him to an American Country Life Association Conference; Wileden's secretary worried that priest might convert him.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/2
Time   20:20
COMMENT ON ACQUAINTANCESHIP WITH CLERGYMEN
Scope and Content Note: Wileden well-acquainted with many clergymen; doesn't consider them “apart from the rest of us.”
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/2
Time   22:35
COMMENT ON U.S.-EDUCATED PERSONS FROM MIDDLE-EASTERN COUNTRIES
Scope and Content Note: For many years “we've done a remarkably good job” in educating people from the Middle-Eastern countries. Educational levels raised, level of expectations increased, and have learned new power and techniques. Oil bargaining position example of new ability to deal with United States.
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/2
Time   28:45
COMMENT ON NEED FOR INTERNATIONALISM
Scope and Content Note: Plea for internationalist approach; “we have to recognize that we're operating on an international basis today. It isn't just the United States of America, it's a matter of the United Nations of the World.”
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/3
Time   00:25
CONTINUATION OF COMMENT ON NEED FOR INTERNATIONALISM
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/3
Time   01:10
COMMENT ON CRITICISM THAT UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN NOT FULFILLING ITS COMMITMENT TO RESIDENTS OF WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: Rejects the criticism; University of Wisconsin has served state residents remarkably well; hand of University visible all over the state. Contemporary criticism from taxpayers who are “temporarily squeezed.”
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/3
Time   07:15
COMMENT ON WORKING WITH THE PEOPLE OF WISCONSIN
Scope and Content Note: “I don't think that I was conscious of what I was doing all the time I was doing it. . . . Some of the things that I did become involved in succeeded far and beyond any reasonable expectation.”
 
 
Tape/Side/Part   11/2/3
Time   08:30
END OF INTERVIEW
 
Index to Interview with Arthur F. Wileden
Abrahamson, Mrs. K.H.
11:1:2, 24:10
Adolfson, Lorentz H.
8:1:2, 05:40
Agency for International Development (AID)
10:2:2, 07:50
Agricultural Practices
2:2, 22:25; 3:1, 05:45, 09:00, 14:25, 25:25; 3:2, 12:15; 4:1, 02:25; 5:1, 09:50; 5:2, 01:30; 8:1:1, 01:00; 8:1:2, 00:20
Agricultural Triangle (veterans organization)
8:2:1, 08:50
Ahlgren, Henry
8:1:1, 28:40; 8:1:2, 04:30, 05:40, 14:10, 15:30; 8:2:1, 26:25; 8:2:2, 23:30; 11:2:2, 01:00
American Country Life Association
11:2:2, 02:05, 18:45
American Country Life Commission
6:2, 13:40
American Farm Bureau Federation, see also Wisconsin Farm Bureau
9:1:1, 09:40
American Medical Association
10:1:1, 13:10
American Society of Equity
9:1:1, 06:35
Anderson, Martin
8:1:3, 05:50, 06:20; 10:2:1, 29:30
Anderson Family (Juneau County)
9:2:1, 00:50
Arithmetic Bees
3:2, 00:50
Ashland
8:1:1, 22:10; 10:1:1, 13:10
Athens, Greece
2:2, 05:40
Baer, Urban
11:2:2, 16:45
Bakken, Henry
7:1, 01:20
Baptist Church
11:2:2, 10:40
Barton, John
7:1, 09:30; 10:1:2, 07:50
Bentley, Madison
6:1, 01:50, 13:45
Better Cities Survey (Kenosha County)
11:2:1, 06:25
Bible
3:2, 30:05
Borchers, Gladys
2:1, 23:10; 6:2, 09:20
Boxing
1:1, 18:45
Boy Scouts of America
1:2, 09:10
Boys of '76
5:1, 01:30
Brock, Henry G.
1:1, 06:40, 12:05, 29:20; 6:1, 01:50
Brookfield
1:2, 17:55
Brown farm (Waukesha County)
2:2, 22:25; 3:1, 05:45, 13:25, 14:25, 19:00, 24:30; 3:2, 18:00
Brunner, Edmund de S.
11:2:1, 17:40
Buffalo Bill (book series)
5:1, 01:30
Buffalo County
11:2:1, 27:40
Burpee (seed company)
4:1, 05:00
Camp Douglas
9:2:2, 09:05
Camp Sheridan
1:2, 12:35
Campbell (town, La Crosse County)
11:1:1, 28:25
Cartter, Bruce
9:2:2, 01:25; 11:2:1, 25:10
Catholic Church
11:2:2, 10:40, 11:45, 14:55
Chapple, John
8:1:1, 22:10; 10:1:1, 13:10
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific railroad
1:1, 14:00
Christian Endeavor Society
1:2, 09:10
Christiansen, Chris L.
6:2, 23:40, 27:00, 28:35; 7:1, 09:30; 8:1:1, 19:15; 8:1:3, 05:50; 10:1:2, 07:50
Church of Christ Scientist
1:1, 05:35
Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)
11:2:1, 00:55
Clark, Warren W.
8:1:1, 06:15; 19:15-28:40; 9:1:2, 21:20; 9:2:1, 07:55; 10:2:1, 07:35, 15:45
Clark County
6:2, 27:00
Climate
3:2, 24:45
Coates, Dr.
3:2, 18:55
Colonization in Northern Wisconsin
6:2, 11:00, 23:40
Columbia University
2:1, 08:50; 11:2:1, 17:40
Commons, John
2:1, 09:35
Communism/Communists
7:1, 11:10, 8:1:1, 22:10
Community Development (book)
2:1, 18:20
Community Organization, see also Rural Community Development
8:2:2, 15:10
Conducting the Business Meeting (circular)
2:1, 23:10; 8:1:3, 07:20
Connell farm (Waukesha County)
2:2, 22:25; 5:1, 18:00, 22:40
Cooper, James Fennimore
5:1, 01:30
Cornell University
2:1, 10:35, 11:20, 13:00; 2:2, 00:55; 6:1, 01:50; 6:2, 06:00; 8:1:3, 06:20; 8:2:1, 19:00
County Council of Community Clubs (Marinette County)
9:2:2, 01:25; 11:2:1, 25:10
County Council of Rural Clubs (Racine County)
1:2, 24:15; 8:2:1, 12:10
County Council of Rural Clubs (Waushara County)
8:2:1, 12:10; 11:2:1, 17:40
County Leadership Training Schools
9:1:2, 03:40
County Rural Resource Development Program
11:2:1, 27:40, 11:2:2, 01:00
County Youth Clubs (Douglas County)
11:1:3, 01:25
Cudahy Bros. Co.
3:1, 00:55, 03:05
Dairying
2:2, 22:25; 3:1, 21:45; 8:1:1, 00:20; 8:1:3, 00:20, 03:00
Danish Folk Schools
6:2, 23:40; 10:1:2, 07:50
Democratic Party
9:1:1, 15:15
Demonstration Farms
4:1, 12:15
Denmark
6:2, 23:40; 7:1, 09:30
Depression
9:1:2, 17:10
Douglas County
11:1:2, 24:10; 11:2:1, 09:15, 10:20
Douglas County Citizens Survey
11:1:2, 24:10; 11:2:1, 06:25
Douglas County Forestry School
11:2:1, 00:55
Douglas County Youth Survey Committee
11:1:2, 24:10; 11:2:1, 00:55
Dousman
1:1, 23:25; 1:2, 09:10, 12:35; 6:1, 19:30
Dramatics for Amateur Groups (circular)
2:1, 23:10
Duffy, Walter A.
11:1:2, 24:10; 11:2:1, 00:55, 11:25, 12:20
Eddy, Mary Baker
1:1, 05:35
England
5:2, 07:45
English
1:1, 25:15, 27:50; 1:2, 11:40
Episcopal Church
1:1, 05:35
Europe
1:2, 12:35
Ewbank, H.L.
2:1, 23:10; 8:1:3, 03:00; 9:1:2, 03:40
Farm Implements
3:1, 09:00, 24:30, 25:25, 29:00; 5:1, 09:50; 23:40
Farm Power
3:1, 13:25, 15:30, 17:00
Farmer Cooperatives in Wisconsin
9:1:1, 17:25
Farmers Alliance
9:1:1, 06:35
Farmers Educational and Cooperative Union of America, see also Wisconsin Farmers Union
9:1:1, 01:00
Farmers Institutes
4:1, 07:40; 10:1:1, 29:30
Farmers Organizations in Wisconsin
7:1, 14:35-27:50; 8:1:2, 19:00, 23:40; 8:1:3, 03:00; 9:1:1, 01:00, 17:25, 21:35; 9:2:1, 14:35; 9:2:2, 15:25
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
2:2, 05:40
Ford (automobile)
3:1, 11:55; 11:2:1, 14:00
4-H Clubs
11:1:1, 05:30; 11:2:1, 25:10
Fourth of July
3:1, 30:20; 3:2, 03:40
Frame, Nat
8:1:1, 06:15
Frank, Glenn
10:1:1, 13:10
French, Louis
9:2:2, 07:05, 09:05
French Island (La Crosse County)
8:1:2, 14:10; 10:2:2, 19:15-33:15; 11:1:1, 00:45, 05:30, 19:40, 20:45, 28:25; 11:1:2, 00:45, 03:10, 08:50, 11:25, 12:00, 13:30, 14:30
Fulbright research grant
2:2, 05:40
Galpin, Charles
2:1, 00:40; 5:2, 25:30; 6;2, 17;45; 7:1, 18;45
Germans
1:1, 27:50; 5:1, 18:00, 20:55
Gillen, John
2:1, 09:35; 6:1, 01:50
Golden Guernsey Cooperative
5:2, 10:40
Grant farm (Waukesha County)
5:1, 23:40
Greece
2:2, 05:40
Greendale
8:2:2, 10:40
Grey, Zane
5:1, 10:30
Hanson, William
C. 6:1, 01:50
Hardiman, Walter
5:1, 23:40
Harrington, Fred H.
8:1:2, 05:40
Hatch, K.L.
8:1:1, 01:00, 06:15; 8:1:2, 27:55; 9:2:1, 07:55
Heil, Julius
10:2:1, 13:30
Hendrickson, Vernon
11:2:1, 27:40; 11:2:2, 00:05
Hibbard, Benjamin H.
2:1, 02:35; 6:1, 27;00, 29;25 6;2, 19;05, 31;25; 7:1, 01:20, 05:55, 07:00
Hog Marketing
3:1, 00:55
Homeopathic Medicine
3:2, 18:55
Hones, Kenneth
6:2, 28:35; 9:1:1, 26;00; 9:2:1, 00:50, 07:55, 26:20; 9:2:2, 18:55
How Can the Buyer Get the Money's Worth? (circular)
10:1:1, 03:50
How to Conduct Group Discussion (circular)
2:1, 23:10; 9:1:2, 03:40; 10:1:1, 03:50
Hutchins, H. Clifton
9:2:3, 00:25
Ihde, Herman
9:2:1, 26:20
Indiana
2:1, 25:00
Internationalism
11:2:2, 28:45; 11:2:3, 00:25
Iowa
2:1, 29:05; 7:1, 27:50
Irvey family (Waukesha County)
1:2, 07:05
Is Dairying Doomed in Wisconsin? (circular)
10:1:1, 03:50
James, J.A.
1:2, 20:00
Jennings, Jack
10:2:2, 30:05; 11:1:1, 05:30; 11:1:2, 06:30
Jorgenson, Emil
11:2:1, 17:40
Kenosha County
11:1:2, 16:40; 11:2:1, 06:25
Kenosha County Citizens Survey
11:1:2, 16:40
Kiekhofer, William
2:1, 09:35
Kohler, Marie
11:2:1, 06:25
Kohler Village
8:2:2, 12:00
Kolb, J.H.
2:1, 00:40, 10:35, 17:35, 18:50; 5:2, 25:30; 6:1, 01:50; 6:2, 01:25, 05:00, 06:00, 07:05; 8:1:1, 06:15, 16:30, 19:15, 26:25; 8:2:1, 14:55; 9:1:2, 21:20; 11:1:2, 16:40
La Crosse
10:2:2, 19:15, 22:45; 11:1:1, 00:45, 19:40, 20:45, 23:30; 11:1:2, 03:10
La Crosse Council of Churches
11:1:1, 20:45
La Crosse State Teachers College
11:1:1, 23:30
La Follette, Philip
9:2:2, 19:30
La Follette, Robert, Sr.
2:1, 26:25; 9:2:2, 19:30
Land Grant Colleges
6:2, 13:40; 8:2:1, 17:10
Langfeld, Larry
11:1:1, 23:30
Liguitti, Msgr.
11:2:2, 11:45
Lindstrom, David E.
2:1, 16:35; 6:1, 09:20; 11:1:2, 16:40
Lisbon (town, Waukesha County)
1:1, 01:3Q
Lisbon Plank Road (Waukesha County)
3:1, 04:35
Long, Jean
8:1:2, 23:40; 9:2:1, 15:15
Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth
5:1, 01:30
Lutheran Church
11:1:1, 20:45; 11:2:2, 10:40
Macklin, Theodore
6:2, 31:25; 7:1, 01:20, 04:10
Madison
1:2, 20:00; 2:1, 21:20; 8:2:2, 20:15
Making Rural Organizations Effective (bulletin)
2:1, 23:10; 7:1, 18:45
Marinette County
11:2:1, 25:10
McCarthy, Joseph R.
7:1, 11:10
McKerrow, Gavin
5:2, 10:40
McKerrow, George
4:1, 07:40; 5:2, 07:45
Menomonee Falls
1:1, 14:00; 3:2, 12:15, 15:35, 18:55; 5:1, 18:00
Menomonee Falls high school
1:1, 14:00, 23:25
Menomonee River
5:1, 22:40
Methodist Church
1:1, 05:35, 18:15; 11:2:2, 10:40
Middle East
11:2:2, 22:35
Milk Jug (retail store)
5:2, 10:40
Milwaukee
3:1, 00:55, 04:35; 8:2:2, 10:40; 9:2:2, 23:10
Milwaukee Journal
9:2:2, 07:05, 09:05
Milwaukee Normal College
1:1, 24:35
Modern Woodmen (fraternal organization)
8:2:1, 00:55
Montgomery Ward Co.
3:2, 15:35
Moore, R.A.
10:1:1, 29:30
Mueller, E.W.
11:2:2, 02:05
National Catholic Rural Life Conference
11:2:2, 16:45
National Church Conference
11:2:2, 02:05
National Farmers Organization (NFO)
8:1:3, 05:25
National Lutheran Council
11:2:2, 02:05
National Youth Administration (NYA)
9:1:2, 17:10; 11:1:3, 01:25
Nelson, Gaylord
9:2:3, 00:25
New York City
2:1, 08:50
Non-Partisan League
9:1:1, 06:35
North Lisbon school (Waukesha County)
1:1, 06:40, 12:05
Northern Wisconsin colonization
6:2, 11:00, 23:40
Ohio State University
2:1, 03:00
Ottawa #1 (school district, Waukesha County)
1:1, 23:25, 25:15, 27:50, 30:05; 1:2, 01:25, 07:05, 11:40, 12:35, 15:15, 18:40
Pabst Brewing Co.
3:2, 12:15
Pabst farm
1:2, 09:10
Parent-Teachers Associations (PTA)
7:1, 18:45; 8:1:2, 23:40; 11:2:1, 09:15, 10:20
Park, Robert E.
2:1, 04:40, 15:10
Patrons of Husbandry
see Wisconsin State Grange
Pearl Harbor
10:2:1, 07:35
Peck, Neal
9:2:2, 01:25; 11:2:1, 25:10
Peshtigo
9:2:2, 01:25
Philippine Islands
10:2:1, 29:30
Plankinton house
3:1, 00:55
Poland China hogs
3:1, 00:55
Poultry-Raising
4:1, 09:35; 5:1, 09:50, 28:10; 5:2, 05:00
Presbyterian Church
11:2:2, 10:40
Presbyterian Theological Seminary (Dubuque, Iowa)
11:1:1, 20:45
Price County
8:2:2, 25:40; 11:2:1, 27:40; 11:2:2, 00:05
Probert Family (Waukesha County)
1:2, 07:05, 07:50
Public Affairs Discussion Program
8:1:3, 00:20, 03:00, 05:50, 06:20; 10:1:1, 03:50. 12:35-15:30
Purdue University
2:1, 26:25
Purnell research grant
2:1, 03:00; 2:2, 00:55
Racine
1:2, 26:10; 6:1, 19:30
Racine County
8:2:1, 12:10
Racine County School of Agriculture
1:2, 20:00, 22:45, 23:50, 27:30
Radicalism
7:1, 11:10; 9:1:1,26:00
Ralph, Osborne W.
11:2:1, 00:55
Republican Party
9:1:1, 15:15
Rhoads, George B.
1:1, 23:25; 1:2, 03:30
Road Work
3:1, 27:40
Rock Island
8:1:2, 14:10
Rock Island State Park
9:2:3, 00:25
Rockwell, Ethel
2:1, 23:10; 6:2, 09:20
Rohde, Gilbert
9:2:1, 00:50
Roosevelt, Theodore
6:2, 13:40
Ross, E.A.
2:1, 09:35; 6:1, 01:50
Rural America (magazine)
1:2, 24:15
Rural Civilian Defense Program in Wisconsin
2:2, 07:20; 10:2:1, 07:35, 15:45, 24:15
Rural Community Development
8:2:1, 00:55, 19:00; 8:2:2, 04:05, 23:30-28:30; 9:1:1, 29:10; 9:1:3, 00:30, 03:30; 10:2:2, 19:15; 11:1:3, 00:05
Rural Community Development (publication)
8:2:2, 15:10
Rural Community Development (university course)
2:2, 02:50; 8:2:2, 15:10, 20:15
Rural Community Organization Handbook (bulletin)
2:1, 00:40; 7:1, 24:15; 8:2:1, 14:55
Rural Community Studies
10:2;2, 00:30
Rural Medical Care
3:2, 18:55
Rural Organization Leaders Conferences, see also Workshop for Professional Community Leaders
2:2, 08:25; 7:1, 18:45; 8:1:2, 19:00-23:40
Rural Social Life
3:1, 30:20; 3:2, 03:40; 4:1, 00:50
Russell, Harry L.
6:2, 23:40, 28:35
Sanderson, Dwight (Mark)
2:1, 11:20; 6:1, 01:50; 6:2, 06:00; 8:2:1, 19:00
Sapiro, Aaron
7:1, 04:10
Schaars, Marvin
7:1, 01:20
Schlitz Brewing Co.
3:2, 12:15
Sears and Roebuck Co.
3:2, 15:35
Shakespeare, William
5:1, 01:30
Sheep-Raising
5:2, 07:45
Singler, Walter
9:2:1, 20:40, 26:20
Small, A.W.
2:1, 15:10
Smith-Hughes Act
10:1:2, 07:50, 14:00
Social Science Research Council fellowship
2:1, 10:35; 2:2, 00:55; 8:2:1, 19:00
Socialists/Socialism
9:2:2, 23:10
South America
11:2:2, 11:45, 14:55
Special Interest Groups in Rural Society (bulletin)
8:1:2, 19:00
Spring Grounds (Waukesha County)
3:2, 03:40
State Medical Society of Wisconsin
10:1:1, 13:10
Steinmeyer's Wholesale Grocery (Milwaukee)
3:1, 00:55
Stevens Rifle
3:1, 19:00
Sunday, Billy
9:2:1, 20:40
Superior
11:2:1, 12:20
Swanton, Milo K.
7:1, 14:35, 16:55; 9:1:2, 12:55; 9:2:1, 00:50; 9:2:2, 02:45, 18:55
Sussex
1:1, 01:30; 3:2, 03:40; 5:1, 23:40; 5:2, 05:00
Taylor, Henry C.
6:2, 17:45, 19:05
Templeton
1:1, 14:00
Town and Country Church Leaders Conferences
2:2, 15:00; 8:1:2, 05:40; 11:2:2, 02:05, 10:40-11:45
United Church of Christ
1:2, 09:10; 11:2:2, 10:40
United Nations
10:2:2, 07:50
United Presbyterian Church
1:1, 27:50; 1:2, 09:10; 5:1, 09:50
United States Army
1:2, 15:15-18:40; 8:2:1, 04:45
United States Army Corps of Engineers
10:2:2, 30:05
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
2:1, 25:00, 26:25; 10:2:2, 07:50
United States Social Security System
9:2:2, 23:10
University of Chicago
2:1, 04:40, 15:10, 15:40
University of Connecticut
2:1, 13:45
University of Michigan
6:1, 01:50
University of Wisconsin-Madison College of Agriculture
2:2, 22:25; 6:2, 17:45, 31:25; 7:1, 09:30; 9:2:1, 07:55, 15:15, 26:20, 29:35; 10:1:1, 29:30; 11:2:1, 12:20
University of Wisconsin-Madison Debating Society
8:2:1, 08:50
University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Agricultural Economics
6:2, 01:25, 17:45, 20:00
University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Economics
6:2, 17:45
University of Wisconsin-Madison Farm and Home Week
2:1, 21:20, 7:1, 05:55
University of Wisconsin-Madison Farm Short Course
10:1:1, 29:30; 10:1:2, 00:25-14:00; 10:2:1, 00:45-06:50; 11:2:1, 00:55
University of Wisconsin-Madison Land Tenure Center
8:2:2, 28:30
University of Wisconsin-Madison Stock Pavilion
9:2:2, 19:30
Volunteer War Service Committee in Wisconsin
10:2:1, 13:30
Vornholt, Dan
9:1:2, 03:40
Wallace, Henry
2:1, 29:05
Wascott
11:2:1, 00:55
Washington, D.C.
2:1, 25:00; 7:1, 11:10; 8:1:1, 26:25; 9:2:1, 00:50, 26:20
Washington Island
8:1:2, 14:10; 9:2:3, 00:25
Waukesha County
1:1, 01:30, 25:15; 1:2, 25:00; 5:1, 09:50
Waushara County
11:2:1, 17:40
Welsh
1:1, 25:15, 27:50; 1:2, 11:40
West Allis
2:1, 21:20,
West La Crosse Civic League
11:1:1, 05:30, 28:25; 11:1:2, 05:25
West Virginia
8:1:1, 06:15
Whittier, John Greenleaf
5:1, 01:30
Who Should Pay the Doctor's Bills? (circular)
10:1:1, 03:50, 11:00, 13:10
Wileden, Harriet Acklam
1:2, 26:10; 2:1, 08:50; 6:1, 17:15
Wileden Family (Arthur)
1:1, 01:30, 02:45, 05:35, 06:40, 20:45, 21:45; 2:2, 22:25; 3:1, 05:45, 07:35, 21:45; 3:2, 18:55, 28:20; 5:1, 18:00, 27:25; 5:2, 05:45; 6:1, 01:50; 8:2:1, 00:55
Wileden farm (Waukesha County)
2:2, 22:25; 09:35; 5:1, 09:50, 23:40
Wilkinson, Frank
10:1:2, 14:00
Williams, Aubrey
11:2:1, 06:25
Wilson, Woodrow
1:2, 15:15, 5:2, 11:55, 20:50
Wisconsin Association of Cooperatives (WAC)
9:1:2, 12:55
Wisconsin Congress of Parents and Teachers
11:2:1, 10:20
Wisconsin Cooperative Milk Pool
9:2:1, 20:40
Wisconsin Council of Agriculture (WCA)
7:1, 14:35, 35; 9:1:2, 12:55; 9:2:2, 02:45
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
11:1:1, 19:40
Wisconsin Division of Resource Development
9:2:2, 23:10
Wisconsin Farm Bureau
8:1:2, 23:40, 27:55; 8:1:3, 00:20; 9:1:1, 11:40, 15:15, 21:35, 26:00; 9:1:2, 03:40, 19:40
Wisconsin Farmers Union
6:2, 27:00, 28:35; 7:1, 18:45; 8:1:2, 23:40, 28:50; 8:1:3, 00:20, 9:1:1, 15:15, 21:35, 26:00; 9:1:2, 12:55, 19:40; 9:2:1, 00:50, 15:15; 11:2:1, 09:15
Wisconsin Folksinger (book)
9:1:2, 03:40
Wisconsin Guernsey Breeders Association
5:2, 10:40
Wisconsin State Grange
7:1, 18:45; 8:1:2, 23:40, 28:50; 9:1:1, 02:30, 21:35; 9:2:1, 26:20, 29:35; 9:2:2, 01:25; 11:2:1, 25:10
Works Progress Administration (WPA)
11:1:3, 01:25
Workshop for Professional Community Leaders, see also Rural Organization Leaders Conferences
2:2, 08:25; 8:2:1, 26:25, 29:30; 8:2:2, 00:35; 9:1:2, 20:35; 9:2:3, 04:20
World War I
4:1, 12:15
World War II
2:2, 07:20, 08:25; 9:1:2, 21:20; 10:2:1, 07:35
Wyoming
5:2, 07:45
Young, A.N.
11:2:1, 09:15, 11:25
Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA)
1:2, 20:00; 8:2:1, 08:50
Youth Companion (magazine)
3:2, 30:05
Zeidler, Frank
9:2:2, 23:10; 9:2:3, 00:25, 04:20

Notes:
[1] : For complete written description of the French Island project, see the Department of Rural Sociology, Community Series #1, French Island: Modern Magic in the Suburbs.
 

 
 

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